Amélie Lacoste

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Amélie Lacoste
Amelie Lacoste at 2009 Skate Canada (2).jpg
Lacoste in 2009
Personal information
Country represented Canada
Born (1988-12-17) December 17, 1988 (age 26)
Montreal, Quebec
Residence Saint-Philippe, Quebec
Height 1.58 m (5 ft 2 in)
Former coach Christy Krall, Damon Allen, Nathalie Martin, Sylvie Fullum, Jocelyne Leduc, Lynn McKay, Louise Michaud, Daniele Robillard
Former choreographer Pasquale Camerlengo, Shae-Lynn Bourne, Julie Marcotte, Jeffrey Buttle
Skating club CPA du Roussillon
Began skating 1993
Retired May 2014
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 163.11
2013 Skate Canada
Short program 59.13
2013 Skate Canada
Free skate 103.98
2013 Skate Canada

Amélie Lacoste (born December 17, 1988) is a Canadian former competitive figure skater. She is the 2010 Skate Canada International bronze medalist and the 2012 Canadian national champion. Her highest placement at an ISU Championship was 7th at the 2010 and 2012 Four Continents Championships.

Career[edit]

Lacoste at the 2012 World Championships

Lacoste won the novice national title in 2003 and the junior national title in 2005.[1] She also competed on the Junior Grand Prix series. She finished 5th in her senior national debut at the 2006 Canadian Championships. She briefly tried pair skating in 2007.[2]

Lacoste won the bronze medal at the 2009 Canadian Championships. She was assigned to her first Four Continents Championships where she finished 10th. The following season, she made her Grand Prix debut, appearing at 2009 Skate Canada International and 2009 Cup of Russia. She finished 7th at the 2010 Four Continents.

Lacoste won the bronze at 2010 Skate Canada International and placed 5th at 2010 Skate America. She won a bronze medal at the 2011 Canadian Championships. She was named an alternate to the World Championships and was given her first berth to the event when Myriane Samson dropped out due to injury.[3]

In 2012, Lacoste won the Canadian national title, defeating Cynthia Phaneuf by 1.57 points. Lacoste then earned a berth to her second World Championships when she placed 7th at the 2012 Four Continents, 0.18 ahead of Phaneuf.[4][5] She finished 16th at the 2012 World Championships in Nice. Lacoste injured her right hip in autumn 2012.[6]

In early October 2013, Lacoste moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado to be coached by Christy Krall and Damon Allen.[7][8] She won the bronze medal at the 2014 Canadian Championships. In May 2014, she announced her retirement from competition.[9]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating
2013–2014
[8][10]
Amélie
by Yann Tiersen:
  • La Valse d'Amélie
  • Les jours tristes
  • Comptine d'un Autre Été: L'Après Midi
  • La Noyée
2012–2013
[11][12]
  • The Feeling Begins
    by Peter Gabriel
2011–2012
[13]
2010–2011
[14]
  • Ojos Negros
Scheherazade
by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov:
  • The Sea and Sinbad's Ship
  • The Story of the Kalender Prince
  • The Young Prince and the Princess
  • Festival at Baghdad
2009–2010
[15]
2008–2009
[2][16]
  • Otonal
    by Raúl di Blasio
  • Montoya
  • Frontera del Ensuenno
  • Gypsy
    (from "Viva Flamenco")
  • Luna Mora
    (from "Flamenco 7 – Pasion Flamenca Tango")
  • Jarcamora
    (from "Compania Talent Danza Flamenco")
  • Camindo Del Darro
    (from "Passion & Soul")
  • Title Theme
    (from "Girlfight")
2005–2006
[1][17]
2004–2005
[1][18]
  • El Conquistador
    by Maxime Rodriguez

Competitive highlights[edit]

International[19]
Event 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14
Worlds 16th 16th
Four Continents 11th 10th 7th 9th 7th 9th 12th
GP Bompard 6th
GP Cup of China 6th
GP Rostelecom 7th 8th
GP Skate America 5th
GP Skate Canada 6th 3rd 6th 8th 5th
U.S. Classic 3rd 5th
International: Junior, Novice[19]
Junior Worlds 15th
JGP Czech Rep. WD
JGP Germany 7th
JGP Japan 9th
JGP Netherlands 12th
JGP Poland 15th
JGP Slovakia 5th
JGP USA 4th
Mladost Trophy 7th N.
National[20]
Canadians 1st N. 9th J. 1st J. 5th WD 8th 3rd 5th 3rd 1st 4th 3rd
Team events
WTT 3rd T
(10th P)
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew
Levels: N. = Novice; J. = Junior
T = Team result; P = Personal result; Medals awarded for team result only.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Mittan, Barry (September 18, 2005). "Lacoste Aims High". Skate Today. 
  2. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (February 22, 2009). "Canada’s Lacoste Makes Huge Comeback". Golden Skate. 
  3. ^ Luchianov, Vladislav (April 4, 2011). "Lacoste plans to soak up experience at worlds". icenetwork.com. Retrieved April 5, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Amelie Lacoste clinches spot at ISU figure skating championships". Postmedia News (National Post). February 12, 2012. Retrieved February 14, 2012. 
  5. ^ Elfman, Lois (March 16, 2012). "Happy to make worlds, Lacoste trains relentlessly". Ice Network. 
  6. ^ Elfman, Lois (January 10, 2013). "Lacoste focuses on self despite Osmond surge". IceNetwork. 
  7. ^ Robertson, Grant (October 26, 2013). "Osmond pulls out of Skate Canada competition with hamstring injury". The Globe and Mail. 
  8. ^ a b "Amelie LACOSTE: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 22, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Amélie Lacoste announces retirement from competitive skating". Skate Canada. May 22, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Amelie Lacoste: 2013/2014". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Amelie Lacoste: 2012/2013". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on January 11, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 26, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 16, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on November 25, 2009. 
  16. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 15, 2009. 
  17. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 19, 2006. 
  18. ^ "Amelie LACOSTE: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 8, 2005. 
  19. ^ a b "Competition Results: Amelie LACOSTE". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 22, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Amelie Lacoste". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on August 4, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Amélie Lacoste at Wikimedia Commons