Amador City, California

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City of Amador City
City
Historic buildings in Amador City
Historic buildings in Amador City
Nickname(s): The gold country’s hidden nugget
Motto: "Essence of the California Gold & Wine Country"
Location of Amador City in Amador County and California
Location of Amador City in Amador County and California
Coordinates: 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417
Country  United States
State  California
County Amador
Settled 1853[citation needed]
Incorporated June 2, 1915[1]
Government
 • Mayor Michael Vasquez[2]
 • State Senate (vacant)[3]
 • State Assembly Frank Bigelow (R)[4]
 • U. S. Congress Tom McClintock (R)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total 0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Land 0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[7] 919 ft (280 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 185
 • Density 590/sq mi (230/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 95601
Area code(s) 209
FIPS code 06-01514
GNIS feature IDs 1657922, 2409693
Website www.amador-city.com

Amador City (formerly, Amadore's Creek and South Amador) is a city in Amador County, California, United States. The population was 185 at the 2010 census, down from 196 at the 2000 census.

Geography[edit]

Amador City is located at 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417Coordinates: 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417.

Only two miles from Sutter Creek on Highway 49, Amador City is the state’s smallest incorporated city by area. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2), all land.

History[edit]

The city was founded in 1863 and it was named after Amador County, California, which was named after California soldier Jose Maria Amador.[8] Amador City was incorporated into a city around 1915. Historically located in a rich gold bearing area in the Motherlode of California. In 1848-1849 an unknown creek was prospected by a wealthy rancher named Jose Maria Amador. There were no known settlements until 1851. The California Gold Rush changed the landscape of California. Amador's most famous and productive mine, the Keystone, produced about $24 million in gold during 1853-1942. These prices would be higher using today's gold standard.[9]

A post office was established at Amador City in 1863.[10]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[11] reported that Amador City had a population of 185. The population density was 589.6 people per square mile (227.7/km²). The racial makeup of Amador City was 171 (92.4%) White, 0 (0.0%) African American, 4 (2.2%) Native American, 2 (1.1%) Asian, 0 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 2 (1.1%) from other races, and 6 (3.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11 persons (5.9%).

The Census reported that 185 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 85 households, out of which 22 (25.9%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 35 (41.2%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 9 (10.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 3 (3.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 10 (11.8%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 0 (0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 26 households (30.6%) were made up of individuals and 9 (10.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18. There were 47 families (55.3% of all households); the average family size was 2.74.

The population was spread out with 37 people (20.0%) under the age of 18, 18 people (9.7%) aged 18 to 24, 40 people (21.6%) aged 25 to 44, 65 people (35.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 25 people (13.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.5 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

There were 108 housing units at an average density of 344.2 per square mile (132.9/km²), of which 54 (63.5%) were owner-occupied, and 31 (36.5%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 6.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.8%. 111 people (60.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 74 people (40.0%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 196 people, 85 households, and 54 families residing in the city. The population density was 601.7 people per square mile (229.3/km²). There were 91 housing units at an average density of 279.4 per square mile (106.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.82% White, 1.02% Native American, 4.08% from other races, and 4.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.18% of the population.

There are 85 households out of which 23.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% are married couples living together, 15.3% have a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% are non-families. 27.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.6% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.31 and the average family size is 2.76.

In the city the population was spread out with 19.4% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 32.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,625, and the median income for a family was $39,861. Males had a median income of $30,313 versus $16,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,963. About 14.0% of families and 22.9% of the population are below the poverty line, including 42.5% of those under the age of 18 and none of those 65 and older.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature, Amador City is in the 8th Senate District, seat currently vacant,[3] and in the 5th Assembly District, represented by Republican Frank Bigelow.[4] Federally, Amador City is in California's 4th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom McClintock.[5]

Points of interest[edit]

Traveling the two blocks on Highway 49 the traveler can see signs of abandonment in this once thriving city, a contrast to the time when the placers and underground mines produced in abundance. An abandoned brick building stand next to the Fleetheart Store, a beautiful reflection of the stone masonry of the time. On Main street in Amador City is the old Imperial Hotel, another example of the beautiful brickwork of California's Past.[13]

  • Little Amador Railroad — G-Scale model train set in a garden that features miniature mines and mills and turn-of-the-century full-size mining equipment.
  • Amador City Cemetery — located behind the Imperial Hotel. Visitors can take a self-guided tour of the 1.25-acre (5,100 m2) cemetery that dates back to the beginning of the town. Historic Highway 49

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved March 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Amador City Government Overview". Amador City CA. Retrieved October 20, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "California's 4th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer File - Places - California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Amador". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  8. ^ William Bright; Erwin Gustav Gudde (30 November 1998). 1500 California place names: their origin and meaning. University of California Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-520-21271-8. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  9. ^ Historic Highway 49
  10. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 442. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  11. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Amador City city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ Division of Mines, The Motherlode Country, Bulletin 141

External links[edit]