Amantea

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Amantea
Comune
Comune di Amantea
View of Amantea on the sea with the Palazzo delle Clarisse.
View of Amantea on the sea with the Palazzo delle Clarisse.
Coat of arms of Amantea
Coat of arms
Amantea is located in Italy
Amantea
Amantea
Location of Amantea in Italy
Coordinates: 39°08′N 16°04′E / 39.133°N 16.067°E / 39.133; 16.067
Country Italy
Region Calabria
Province Cosenza (CS)
Frazioni Acquicella, Camoli, Campora San Giovanni, Coreca, Colongi
Government
 • Mayor Francesco Tonnara
Area
 • Total 28 km2 (11 sq mi)
Elevation 50 m (160 ft)
Population (31 December 2011)[1]
 • Total 13,754
 • Density 490/km2 (1,300/sq mi)
Demonym Amanteani
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 87032
Dialing code 0982
Patron saint St. Anthony of Padua
Saint day June 13
Website Official website

Amantea (Greek: Amanthea) is a town and comune in the province of Cosenza in the Calabria region of southern Italy.

It is a tourist centre on the southern Tyrrhenian Sea coast.

History[edit]

Amantea appears as a centre of its own in the 7th century, although traces of human presence from pre-historical times onwards have been found in the area. In 839 the Arabs captured it, being ousted by the Byzantines in 889. Later it was under Norman domination. In 1269 the Amanteani rebelled against the Angevines in the name of Conradin of Hohenstaufen, but were besieged by the French and defeated.

The town is mostly famous for the long resistance of its inhabitants against the French troops under Joseph Bonaparte who, in 1806–1807, attempted to conquer its castle.

In July 1810, three British warships, the frigate HMS Thames, HMS Weazle, and Pilot, captured or destroyed a convoy of 31 coasting vessels that were carrying stores and provisions from Naples to Murat's army at Scylla. Seven large gunboats, four scampavias, and an armed pinnace protected the convoy. At the approach of the British warships the convoy and its escorts beached themselves in front of Amantea, but the British were still able to capture almost all the vessels, and destroy half a dozen, all while suffering only minimal casualties.

Main sights[edit]

  • The Rocca (Castle). First built by the Byzantines, it was strengthened by the Arabs. The current cylindrical tower is however to the Norman-Hohenstaufen age. It was long besieged by Charles of Anjou's troops in 1269. It was nearly destroyed during the French siege in 1806-1807. It is now a public structure, but is abandoned.
  • Church of San Bernardino.
  • Palazzo delle Clarisse (17th century).
  • Palazzo Mirabelli (17th century).
  • U Turriune (large tower, 14th century) at Campora San Giovanni.
  • Archaeological findings in the area of Campora San Giovanni.
  • Capuchins Church.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Population data from Istat

References[edit]

  • Lorelli, Alfonso (2009). Amantea nel XX secolo. Catanzaro: Rubettino.