American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Formation 1953
Type professional association
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Location
Membership
7,500
Official language
English
2009-2011 President
Laurence Lee Greenhill, M.D.
Website aacap.org

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit professional association in the United States dedicated to facilitating psychiatric care for children and adolescents. Established in 1953, the Academy is headquartered in Washington, D.C.[1][2] Various levels of membership are available to physicians specialized in child psychiatry or pediatrics, as well as medical students interested in the field, in the United States and abroad.[3]

Mission[edit]

The Academy's official mission, adopted in 1994 with later emendations, is to "Promote the healthy development of children, adolescents, and families through research, training, prevention, comprehensive diagnosis and treatment and to meet the professional needs of child and adolescent psychiatrists throughout their careers."[4]

Publications[edit]

Since 1962, the AACAP has published its monthly journal, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). There have been concerns about industry-sponsored clinical trials published in the journal. JAACAP editors have repeatedly declined to retract the journal's 2001 article on study 329, a clinical trial examining paroxetine and teenagers. The trial was sponsored by, and ghostwritten on behalf of, SmithKline Beecham (now GlaxoSmithKline), and is widely regarded as having downplayed the trial's negative results.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Us". AACAP. Archived from the original on 21 April 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "Contact Us". Archived from the original on 21 April 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "Who can become a member?". AACAP. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Mission Statement". AACAP. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  5. ^ Isabel Heck, "Controversial Paxil paper still under fire 13 years later", The Brown Daily Herald, 2 April 2014.
  6. ^ Melanie Newman, "The Rules of Retraction", BMJ, 341(7785), 11 December 2010, pp. 1246–1248. doi:10.1136/bmj.c6985 PMID: 21138994

External links[edit]