American Committee for Cultural Freedom

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The American Committee for Cultural Freedom (ACCF) was the U.S. affiliate of the anti-Communist Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF).

Overview[edit]

The ACCF and CCF were organizations that, during the Cold War, sought to encourage intellectuals to be critical of the Soviet Union and Communism, and to combat, according to a writer for the New York Times, "the continuing strength of the Soviet myth among the Western cultural elite. Despite all that had happened - the Moscow show trials, the Nazi-Soviet pact, the assassination of Leon Trotsky, the Russian attack on Finland, the takeovers in Eastern Europe, the mounting evidence of the gulag - Joseph Stalin still retained the loyalty of many writers, artists and scientists who viewed the Soviet Union as a progressive alternative to the 'reactionary,' 'war-mongering' United States."[1] The CCF was in part funded by the CIA.

Members[edit]

The dominant figure in the organization was Sidney Hook. Its 600-strong membership encompassed leading figures on both the Right and the Left, some of whom included:

The committee's central or executive committee varied over time. James Burnham was a member until he left the group circa 1954.[2] Whittaker Chambers was also a member of the executive committee.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cranky Integrity on the Left" in The New York Times (August 27, 1989)
  2. ^ Smant, Kevin J. (1992). How Great the Triumph: James Burnham, Anti-Communism, and the Conservative Movement. University Press of America. p. 45. 
  3. ^ Chambers, Whittaker (1987). Odyssey of a Friend (reprint ed.). Washington: Regnery. p. 229. 

Sources[edit]