American Marketing Association

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The American Marketing Association (AMA) is a professional association for marketing professionals with 30,000 members as of 2012.[1] It has 76 professional chapters and 250 collegiate chapters across the United States.[2][3]

The AMA was formed in 1937 from the merger of two predecessor organizations, the National Association of Marketing Teachers and the American Marketing Society. It also publishes a number of handbooks and research monographs.[4] The AMA publishes the Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, and Marketing News.

Organization[edit]

The American Marketing Association has a board of directors and a set of councils with positions that are elected annually by its members.[5] The headquarters is located in Chicago, Il.

History[edit]

At a 1915 convention of the Associated Advertising Clubs of the World, a group of advertising teachers established the National Association of Teachers of Advertising. Initial discussions revolved around the definition of advertising and the study of advertising. The group's name changed to National Association of Teachers of Marketing & Advertising and its focus eventually expanded to marketing, incorporating educators from a variety of disciplines, including economics and accounting.

Approximately 15 years later a second organization, the American Marketing Society, was founded dedicated to the science of marketing. Lewis and Owen explained the first president, Paul Nystrom, "expressed a need to find ways of lowering the cost of marketing, a concern for criticisms against marketing, and an interest in finding 'useful tools and devices in marketing practice.'" [6]

The two organizations jointly published the Journal of Marketing in 1936 and merged in 1937 to form the American Marketing Association. The association was housed at the University of Illinois in its early years and eventually moved its headquarters to Chicago as its professional staff expanded.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About AMA". American Marketing Association. Archived from the original on 18 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-03. 
  2. ^ "Chapters". American Marketing Association. 2007. Archived from the original on October 31, 2007. Retrieved December 1, 2007. 
  3. ^ "History of the American Marketing Association". American Marketing Association. 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2010. 
  4. ^ Boone, Louis E., and David L. Kurtz. Contemporary Marketing. Fort Worth, TX: Dryden Press, 1992. ISBN 978-0-03-054018-9
  5. ^ American Marketing Association 2012-2013 Election. (2012). Marketing News, 46(2), 6-7.
  6. ^ Early History of the American Marketing Association and the Journal of Marketing. (1993). Journal of Marketing, 488.

External links[edit]

  • www.ama.org – AMA website for professional marketers