American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine

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American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine
American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine logo.jpg
Abbreviation AOBIM
Formation 1942
Type Professional
Headquarters Tulsa, OK
Coordinates 36°08′15″N 96°00′17″W / 36.1376°N 96.0048°W / 36.1376; -96.0048Coordinates: 36°08′15″N 96°00′17″W / 36.1376°N 96.0048°W / 36.1376; -96.0048
Chairman Kenneth Adams, D.O.
Vice Chairman Brad Suprenant, D.O.
Secretary-Treasurer Beckie Michael, D.O.
Website aobim.org

The American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine (AOBIM) is an organization that provides board certification to qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease in adults (internists). The board is one 18 medical specialty certifying boards of the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA),[1] and was established in 1942. As of December 2011, 3,072 osteopathic internal medical physicians held active certification with the AOBIM.[2]

Board Certification[edit]

Initial certification is available to osteopathic internal medicine physicians who have successfully completed an AOA-approved residency in internal medicine, two years of practice, successful completion of written and oral exams, and chart review.

Voluntary recertification was first offered in Fall 1994, and mandatory recertification began in March 1997. Before this time, the initial board certification was permanent and recertification was not required. Since March 1997, if a physician does not recertify every eight years, their board certification status expires.

Osteopathic internal medicine physicians may receive Certification of Special Qualifications in the following areas:[3][4]

Osteopathic internal medicine physicians may also receive Certification of Added Qualifications (CAQ) in the following areas:[3][4]

The Certification of Added Qualifications must be maintained through the process of recertification every 10 years.

In order for an osteopathic physician to be board-certified in any specialty, they must be AOA members, pay certification fees, and complete at least 120 hours of continuing medical education in a three-year period.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AOA Specialty Certifying Boards". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Ayres, Ronald E; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, E (April 2012). "Changes to Osteopathic Specialty Board Certification". Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 112 (4): 226–231. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Specialties & Subspecialties". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Medical Boards: Osteopathic". Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Osteopathic Certification". American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Retrieved 20 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "Certification of Osteopathic Physicians". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 

External links[edit]