American Osteopathic Board of Pathology

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American Osteopathic Board of Pathology
American Osteopathic Board of Pathology logo.jpg
Abbreviation AOBPa
Formation 1943[1]
Type Professional
Headquarters Chicago, Illinois, IL[1]
Coordinates 41°53′39″N 87°37′08″W / 41.8942°N 87.6190°W / 41.8942; -87.6190Coordinates: 41°53′39″N 87°37′08″W / 41.8942°N 87.6190°W / 41.8942; -87.6190
Chair Gregory McDonald, D.O.[1]
Vice-Chair Alan F. Henke, D.O.
Secretary-Treasurer Karen P. Kantor, D.O.
Website aobpath.org

The American Osteopathic Board of Nuclear Medicine (AOBPa) is an organization that provides board certification to qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the diagnosis and characterization of disease in patients following thorough examination of biopsies and/or bodily fluids (pathologists).[2] The board is one 18 medical specialty certifying boards of the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA),[3][4] and was established in 1974. As of December 2011, 55 osteopathic pathologists held active certification with the AOBPa.[5] In addition to fellows of the American Board of Pathology, board certified osteopathic pathologists are eligible for admission to the College of American Pathologists and to the American Society for Mohs Surgery.[6][7]

Board certification[edit]

To become board certified in pathology, candidates must have completed an AOA-approved residency in pathology. Additionally, candidates must have successfully completed the required clinical, oral, and written exams.[8] Since 1995, board certified osteopathic pathologists must renew their certification every ten years to avoid expiration of their board certification status.[8][9][10] The AOBPa oversees examination of candidates in the areas of anatomic pathology, dermatopathology, forensic pathology, and laboratory medicine. Additionally, the AOBPa provides a Certificate of Added Qualifications in dermatopathology and a Certificate of Special Qualifications in forensic pathology.[8][9][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About AOBPa". American Osteopathic Board of Pathology. 2010. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  2. ^ University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria (2011). "An Introduction to Pathology". University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "AOA Specialty Certifying Boards". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "American Osteopathic Board of Pathology". Health Workforce Information Center. 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2012. 
  5. ^ Ayres, Ronald E; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, E (April 2012). "Changes to Osteopathic Specialty Board Certification". Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 112 (4): 226–231. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "Forensic Pathology". College of American Pathologists. 2012. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  7. ^ "Fellow Member". American Society for Mohs Surgery. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c "Application Handbook". American Osteopathic Board of Pathology. 2012. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Medical Boards: Osteopathic". Castle Connolly Medical,Ltd. 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  10. ^ "Recertification". American Osteopathic Board of Pathology. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  11. ^ "Specialties & Subspecialties". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 

External links[edit]