American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation logo.jpg
Abbreviation AOBPMR
Formation 1954[1]
Type Professional
Headquarters Chicago, IL[1]
Coordinates 41°53′39″N 87°37′08″W / 41.8942°N 87.61902°W / 41.8942; -87.61902Coordinates: 41°53′39″N 87°37′08″W / 41.8942°N 87.61902°W / 41.8942; -87.61902
Chair John L. Hart, DO[1]
Vice-Chair Jim R. Sylvain, DO
Secretary-Treasurer J. Michael Wieting, DO, MEd.
Website aobpmr.org
Formerly called American Osteopathic Board of Rehabilitation Medicine[2]

The American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AOBPMR) is an organization that provides board certification to qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the treatment of patients with physical impairments or disabilities (physiatrists). The board is one of 18 medical specialty certifying boards of the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA),[3][4] and was established in 1954. The AOBPMR is one of two certifying boards for physiatrists in the United States. The other certifying authority is the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties. As of 2011, 220 osteopathic physiatrists held active certification with the AOBPMR.[5]

Board certification[edit]

To become board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, candidates must have completed an AOA-approved residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation and either one year of practice as a licensed physiatrist or one year of a physical medicine and rehabilitation fellowship following the completion of residency.[6] Additionally, candidates must have successfully completed the required oral and written examinations. Since 2004, board certified osteopathic physiatrists must renew their certification every ten years to avoid expiration of their board certified status.[7][8]

Diplomates of the AOBPMR may also receive Certification of Added Qualifications (CAQ) in Hospice and Palliative Medicine[9] and sports medicine after receiving additional training.[8][10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About the AOBPMR". American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2010. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  2. ^ Ayres, RE; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, EC (March 2009). "Osteopathic specialty board certification.". The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 109 (3): 181–90. PMID 19336771. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "AOA Specialty Certifying Boards". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation". Health Workforce Information Center. 2011. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  5. ^ Ayres, Ronald E; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, E (April 2012). "Changes to Osteopathic Specialty Board Certification". Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 112 (4): 226–231. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "Eligibility Guidelines for AOBPMR Board Certification in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation". American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  7. ^ "Applicant Handbook 2012". American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2012. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Medical Boards: Osteopathic". Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  9. ^ "Osteopathic Certification". American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Retrieved 20 September 2012. 
  10. ^ "Specialties & Subspecialties". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  11. ^ "Certification". American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2010. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 

External links[edit]