American Osteopathic Board of Surgery

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American Osteopathic Board of Surgery
American Osteopathic Board of Surgery logo.jpg
Abbreviation AOBS
Formation 1940[1]
Type Professional
Headquarters Huber Heights, OH
Coordinates 39°50′27″N 84°08′16″W / 39.8408°N 84.1379°W / 39.8408; -84.1379Coordinates: 39°50′27″N 84°08′16″W / 39.8408°N 84.1379°W / 39.8408; -84.1379
Chairman
Albert H.O.-Yurvati, D.O.
Vice Chairman
Gary L. Roth, D.O.
Secretary-Treasurer
Kenneth Lim, D.O.
Website aobs.org

The American Osteopathic Board of Surgery (AOBS) is an organization that provides board certification qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the use of surgery to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of disease (surgeons). The board is one 18 medical specialty certifying boards of the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA).[2] As of 2011, 1,279 osteopathic physicians held active certification with the AOBS.[3] The AOBS is one of two certifying boards for surgeons in the United States; the other certifying board is the American Board of Surgery of the American Board of Medical Specialties.[4] Fellows of the AOBS, in addition to fellows of the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, are eligible for membership in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.[5] Board certified surgeons of the AOBS are also eligible for membership in the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery.[6]

Board certification[edit]

Initial certification is available to osteopathic physicians who have successfully completed an AOA-approved surgical residency, and successfully completed the required written and oral exams.

Recertification became mandatory in 1997. Before this time, the initial board certification was permanent and recertification was not required. Since 1997, diplomates the American Osteopathic Board of Surgery requires osteopathic surgeons to renew their certification every ten years to avoid expiration of their board certified status.[7]

Osteopathic surgeons may also receive primary board certification in the following areas:[7][8]

Osteopathic surgeons may also receive Certification of Added Qualifications in surgical critical care.[8] The Certification of Added Qualifications must be maintained through the process of recertification every 10 years.

In order for an osteopathic physician to be board-certified in any specialty, they must be AOA members, pay certification fees, and complete at least 120 hours of continuing medical education in a three-year period.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ayres, RE; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, EC (March 2009). "Osteopathic specialty board certification.". The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 109 (3): 181–90. PMID 19336771. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  2. ^ "AOA Specialty Certifying Boards". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  3. ^ Ayres, Ronald E; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, E (April 2012). "Changes to Osteopathic Specialty Board Certification". Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 112 (4): 226–231. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  4. ^ "Application for Privileges General Surgery". Privilege Criteria. New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners. Retrieved 20 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "Candidate Membership". The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2013. Retrieved 20 April 2013. 
  6. ^ "Become a Member". Why Join the ASMBS?. American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery. 2013. Retrieved 20 April 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Medical Boards: Osteopathic". Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Specialties & Subspecialties". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  9. ^ "Certification of Osteopathic Physicians". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 

External links[edit]