American Samoan general election, 2012

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This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
American Samoa

General elections were held in American Samoa on 6 November 2012,[1] alongside a referendum on giving the Fono veto power over the Governor. Voters chose a new Governor and Lieutenant Governor, twenty members for the American Samoa House of Representatives, and the Delegate to United States House of Representatives.[2] Incumbent Governor Togiola Tulafono was term-limited and could not seek re-election.

Gubernatorial election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Timothy Jones, businessman
    • Running mate: Tuika Tuika, government official and candidate for Governor in 2008[5]
  • Lolo Letalu Matalasi Moliga, President of the Development Bank of American Samoa
  • Save Liuato Afa Tuitele, former Judge of the High Court of American Samoa
    • Running mate: Tofoitaufa Sandra King-Young, founder and CEO of the Pacific Islands Center for Educational Development[9]

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

American Samoa Fono[edit]

Voters elected twenty members to the American Samoa House of Representatives.[2]

Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Voters will also choose American Samoa's delegate to the United States House of Representatives, who holds office for a two year term. Incumbent Eni Faleomavaega won re-election to a 113th, two-year term.

Referendum[edit]

Voters were asked "Should Article II, Sections 9 and 19 of the revised constitution of American Samoa be revised to give the Fono, rather than the Secretary for the U.S. Department of Interior, the power to override the Governors veto?"[12]

The proposal would involve amending two parts of the constitution:

Section Existing text Proposed text
Chapter II
article 9
section 3
Not later than 14 months after a bill has been vetoed by the Governor, it may be passed over his veto by a two-thirds majority of the entire membership of each House at any session of the Legislature, regular or special. A bill so repassed shall be represented to the Governor for his approval. If he does not approve it within 15 days, he shall send it together with his comment thereon to the Secretary of the Interior. If the Secretary of the Interior approves it within 90 days after its receipt by him, it shall become a law; otherwise it shall not. Not later than 14 months after a bill has been vetoed by the Governor, it may be passed over his veto by a two-thirds majority of the entire membership of each House at any session of the Legislature, regular or special. A bill so repassed shall become law 90 days after the adjournment of the session in which it was repassed.
Chapter II
article 19
An act of the Legislature required to be approved and approved by the Governor only shall take effect no-sooner than 60 days from the end of the session at which the same shall have been passed while an act required to be approved by the Secretary of the Interior only after its veto by the Governor and so approved shall take effect no sooner than 40 days after its return to the Governor by the Secretary of the Interior. The foregoing is subject to the exception that in case of an emergency the act may take effect at an earlier date stated in the act provided that the emergency be declared in the preamble and in the body of the act. An act of the Legislature required to be approved and approved by the Governor only shall take effect no-sooner than 60 days from the end of the session at which the same shall have been passed. The foregoing is subject to the exception that in case of an emergency the act may take effect at an earlier date stated in the act provided that the emergency be declared in the preamble and in the body of the act.

Results[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 5,852 44.92
Against 7,177 55.08
Invalid/blank votes
Total 13,029 100
Registered voters/turnout 17,774
Source: Direct Democracy

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Electoral Calendar - international elections world elections". Archived from the original on 26 May 2011. Retrieved 2011-05-12. 
  2. ^ a b "American Samoa officials ready for next week’s election". Radio New Zealand International. 2012-10-30. Retrieved 2012-11-01. 
  3. ^ Sagapolutele, Fili (February 26, 2012). "Female Educator Enters Race For Am. Samoa Governor". Samoa News. East-West Center. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  4. ^ Montgomery, Nancy (September 2, 2012). "After 37 years in uniform, Army veteran turns eye to politics". Stars and Stripes. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  5. ^ Feagaimaalii-Luamanu, Joyetter (September 4, 2012). "Who's on the ballot?". Talanei. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  6. ^ Feagaimaalii-Luamanu, Joyetter (February 22, 2012). "AFOA AND LE'I OFFICIALLY ENTER 2012 GUBERNATORIAL RACE". Samoa News. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Former President of American Samoa Senate enters gubernatorial race". Radio New Zealand International. October 20, 2011. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  8. ^ "American Samoa's Lt Governor vies top job in next year’s election". Radio New Zealand International. November 22, 2011. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Save picks woman as American Samoa co-candidate". Radio New Zealand International. January 23, 2012. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  10. ^ Deposa, Moneth (August 24, 2011). "CUC to lose its executive director". Saipan Tribune. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  11. ^ "American Samoa governor candidate withdraws from race". Radio New Zealand International. October 11, 2011. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  12. ^ 2012 Amendment to the Revised Constitution American Samoa Government Election Office