American Slavery as It Is

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American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses
Author Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina and Sarah Grimké
Country United States
Language English
Subject Slavery and emancipation
Published American Anti-Slavery Society

American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses is a book written by the American abolitionist Theodore Dwight Weld, his wife Angelina Grimke and her sister Sarah Grimke, which was published in 1839.[1][2]

A follower of the abolitionist movement, Weld was a white New Englander who composed this book using many first hand accounts of slavery and its horrors. The work focuses on the afflictions that slaves faced, such as their diet, clothing, housing, and working conditions. In the book, Weld also discussed several pro-slavery arguments. American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses was distributed by the American Anti-Slavery Society, and was very influential in the formative days of the abolitionist movement. Weld's work was the second most influential piece of anti-slavery literature of the time period, second only to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, and was used by Stowe as inspiration for her abolitionist novel.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Weld, Theodore Dwight, 1803-1895. "American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses (Electronic Edition)". Documenting the American South. Retrieved 2013-07-05. 
  2. ^ Monique Prince. "Theodore Dwight Weld, 1803-1895". Documenting the American South. Retrieved 2013-07-05. 

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