American wild ale

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American wild ale is a style of beer pioneered by American microbreweries which is characterized by the use of yeasts other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation.[1] Beers in this style are typically fermented using a strain of brettanomyces for part or all of the fermentation. [2] The use of brettanomyces or other yeasts can result in a funky, complex flavor profile can be inappropriate to other beer styles. Examples include Jolly Pumpkin Perseguidor,[3] Avery 15,[4] Ommegang Ommegeddon,[5] and Avery Brabant.[6]

The style is recognized by the BeerAdvocate website,[7] but not by the BJCP[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Beer Nut: Love 'em or leave 'em Art Illman/Daily News staff By Norman Miller GateHouse News Service Posted May 28, 2008 [1]
  2. ^ Greg Kitsock "A Yeast That Brings Out Brewers' Wild Side" Washington Post September 2, 2009 [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ The Beer Nut: Love 'em or leave 'em Art Illman Daily News staff Norman Miller GateHouse News Service May 28, 2008 [4]
  5. ^ The Beer Nut: Pair your Thanksgiving menu with beer Allan Jung/Daily News staff By Norman Miller GateHouse News Service Posted Nov 18, 2008 [5]
  6. ^ 11 FEBRUARY 2009 Ales gone "wild"! Hoppy Valentine's Day [6]
  7. ^ "American Wild Ale"
  8. ^ "2008 BJCP Style Guidelines"