Amniotic sac

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Amniotic sac
Gray34.png
A drawing of the amniotic sac from Gray's Anatomy.
Amnion.jpg
The amniotic sac opened during afterbirth examination.

The amniotic sac (also bag of waters) is the sac in which the fetus develops in amniotes. It is a thin but tough transparent pair of membranes, which hold a developing embryo (and later fetus) until shortly before birth. The inner membrane, the amnion, contains the amniotic fluid and the fetus. The outer membrane, the chorion, contains the amnion and is part of the placenta. Its wall is the amnion, the inner of the two fetal membranes. It encloses the amniotic cavity and the embryo. The amniotic cavity contains the amniotic fluid. On the outer side, the amniotic sac is connected to the yolk sac, to the allantois and, through the umbilical cord, to the placenta.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] Amniocentesis is a medical procedure where fluid from the sac is sampled[9] to be used in prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities and fetal infections,[10]

In mammals[edit]

The amniotic sac and its filling provide a liquid that surrounds and cushions the fetus. It allows the fetus to move freely within the walls of the uterus. Buoyancy is also provided.

In humans[edit]

If, after birth, the complete amniotic sac or big parts of the membrane remain coating the newborn, this is called a caul.

When seen in the light, the amniotic sac is shiny and very smooth, but tough.

Once the baby is pushed out of the mother's abdomen, the umbilical cord, placenta, and amniotic sac are pushed out in the after birth.

Amniotic cavity[edit]

Amniotic cavity
Gray31.png
Model of human embryo 1.3 mm. long.
Latin cavitas amniotica
Gray's p.56
Carnegie stage 5a
Code TE E6.0.1.1.5.0.8

The amniotic cavity is the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid. The amniotic cavity is formed by the fusion of the parts of the amniotic fold, which first makes its appearance at the cephalic extremity, and subsequently at the caudal end and sides of the embryo. As the amniotic fold rises and fuses over the dorsal aspect of the embryo, the amniotic cavity is formed.

Formation of the Amniotic Cavity[edit]

At the beginning of the second week, a cavity appears within the inner cell mass and when it enlarges it becomes the Amniotic cavity. The floor of the amniotic cavity is formed by the epiblast. Epiblast migrates between the epiblastic disc and trophoblast. In this way the epiblastic cells migrate between the embryoblast and trophoblast . The floor is formed by the epiblast which later on transforms to ectoderm while the remaining cells which are present between the embryoblast and trophoblast are called amnioblasts (flattened Cells). These cells are also derived from epiblast which is transformed into ectoderm.

The amniotic cavity is surrounded by a membrane, called the amnion. As the implantation of the blastocyst progresses, a small space appears in the embryoblast, which is the primordium of the amniotic cavity. Soon amniogenic (Amnion forming cells) amnioblasts separate from the epiblast and line the amnion, which encloses the amniotic cavity.

The epiblast forms the floor of the amniotic cavity and is continuous peripherally with the amnion. The hypoblast forms the roof of the exocoelomic cavity and is continuous with the thin exocoelomic membrane. This membrane along with hypoblast forms the primary yolk sac. The embryonic disc now lies between the amniotic cavity and the primary yolk sac. Cells from the yolk sac endoderm form a layer of connective tissue, the extraembryonic mesoderm, which surrounds the amnion and yolk sac.

Amniotomy[edit]

An artificial rupture of membranes (AROM), also known as an amniotomy, may be performed by a obstetrician, family doctor, or midwife, . This is usually performed using an amnihook or fingercot and is intended to induce or accelerate labour.

Diversity[edit]

The presence of the amnion identifies humans and other mammals as amniotes, along with reptiles, dinosaurs, birds but neither amphibians nor fish.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ eMedicine Dictionary
  2. ^ Knodel, Hans; Bayrhuber, Horst (1983). Linder Biologie. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzlersche Verlagsbuchhandlung und Carl Ernst Poeschel Verlag GmbH. ISBN 3-476-20261-5. 
  3. ^ Glossary at www.medgen.ubc.ca/robinsonlab
  4. ^ Mondofacto Dictionary
  5. ^ Dictionary at MedicineNet
  6. ^ Medical Dictionary
  7. ^ Medical dictionary and Encyclopedia at TheFreeDictionary
  8. ^ Dictionary and Encyclopedia at MedlinePlus
  9. ^ The word amniocentesis itself indicates precisely the procedure in question, Gr. ἀμνίον amníon being the "inner membrane round the foetus" and κέντησις kéntēsis meaning "pricking", i.e. its puncture in order to retrieve some amniotic fluid.
  10. ^ "Diagnostic Tests – Amniocentesis". Harvard Medical School. Retrieved 2008-07-15. 

External links[edit]