Amos, Quebec

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Amos
Town
Skyline of Amos and the Harricana River
Skyline of Amos and the Harricana River
Coat of arms of Amos
Coat of arms
Location within Abitibi RCM.
Location within Abitibi RCM.
Amos is located in Western Quebec
Amos
Amos
Location in western Quebec.
Coordinates: 48°34′N 78°07′W / 48.567°N 78.117°W / 48.567; -78.117Coordinates: 48°34′N 78°07′W / 48.567°N 78.117°W / 48.567; -78.117[1]
Country  Canada
Province  Quebec
Region Abitibi-Témiscamingue
RCM Abitibi
Settled 1910
Constituted January 17, 1987
Government[2][3]
 • Mayor Ulrick Chérubin
 • Federal riding Abitibi—Témiscamingue
 • Prov. riding Abitibi-Ouest
 • MNA: François Gendron (PQ)
Area[2][4]
 • Town 435.10 km2 (167.99 sq mi)
 • Land 430.67 km2 (166.28 sq mi)
 • Urban[5] 7.91 km2 (3.05 sq mi)
 • Metro[6] 1,650.99 km2 (637.45 sq mi)
Elevation[7] 310.00 m (1,017.06 ft)
Population (2011)[4]
 • Town 12,671
 • Density 29.4/km2 (76/sq mi)
 • Urban[5] 9,400
 • Urban density 1,188.8/km2 (3,079/sq mi)
 • Metro[6] 17,090
 • Metro density 10.4/km2 (27/sq mi)
 • Pop 2006-2011 Increase 0.7%
 • Dwellings 5,787
Time zone EST (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC−4)
Postal code(s) J9T
Area code(s) 819
Highways Route 109
Route 111
Route 395
Website www.ville.amos.qc.ca

Amos is a town in northwestern Quebec, Canada, on the Harricana River. It is the seat of Abitibi Regional County Municipality.

Amos is the main town on the Harricana River, and the smallest of the three primary towns — after Rouyn-Noranda and Val-d'Or — in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec. Its main resources are spring water, gold and wood products, including paper. In 2012, Quebec Lithium Corp. re-opened Canada's first lithium mine, which had operated as an underground mine from 1955–65. They are planning to carve an open pit mine over pegmatite dikes. (The pegmatite is about 1% lithium carbonate.) The mine is about 60 kilometres (37 mi) north of Val d'Or, 38 kilometres (24 mi) southeast of Amos, and 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) km west of Barraute. It is in the northeast corner of La Corne Township. Access to the mine is via paved road from Val d'Or.[8]

The smaller communities of Lac-Gauvin and Saint-Maurice-de-Dalquier are also within the municipal boundaries of Amos.

History[edit]

The Amos Cathedral

Rupert's Land, in which Abitibi was located, was owned by the Hudson's Bay Company and was bought by Canada in 1869. Abitibi itself was then annexed to the province in Quebec on June 13, 1898 by an act of the federal Parliament.

Amos was the first colonisation point for the region of Abitibi, with colonization beginning in 1910. The municipality was established in 1914 while the city itself was chartered in 1925. The name of the city came from the maiden name of the wife of Sir Lomer Gouin, then premier of Quebec.

A related municipality was created in 1917 under the name 'Municipalité de la partie ouest des cantons unis de Figuery et Dalquier' (Municipality of the western part of the united townships of Figuery and Dalquier) which changed its name to Amos-Ouest in 1949. In 1974 the municipality fused with the city of Amos proper. Another related municipality was created in 1918 under the name 'Municipalité de la partie est des cantons Figuery et Dalquier' (Municipality of the eastern part of the united townships of Figuery and Dalquier), which also changed its name later 1950 to Amos-Est. The municipality was finally integrated into the city of Amos itself in 1987.

Government[edit]

The current mayor of the city is Ulrick Chérubin, one of the first black mayors in the province of Quebec. As of the 2009 municipal elections, the council consists of Sébastien d'Astous, Amélie Mercier, Eric Mathieu, Denis Chandonnet, Benoît Deshaies and Julie Cazes.

In the National Assembly of Quebec, Amos is within the electoral district of Abitibi-Ouest, represented by Parti Québécois MNA François Gendron. In the Canadian House of Commons, the city is in the Abitibi—Témiscamingue district, represented by NDP MP Christine Moore.

Amos is the seat of the judicial district of Abitibi.[9]

Media[edit]

Demographics[edit]

The town's urban area had a population of 9,400 in the Canada 2011 Census. Its census agglomeration, which consists of Amos itself, the municipalities of Saint-Dominique-du-Rosaire, Saint-Félix-de-Dalquier, Saint-Mathieu-d'Harricana, Sainte-Gertrude-Manneville, the township municipality of Trécesson and the Indian reserve of Pikogan, had a population of 17,090.

In the Canada 2006 Census, the census agglomeration had been defined differently: it did not include Saint-Félix-de-Dalquier but did include Landrienne and Saint-Marc-de-Figuery.[10]

Population trend:[11]

  • Population in 2011: 12,671 (2006 to 2011 population change: 0.7%)
  • Population in 2006: 12,584
  • Population in 2001: 13,044
  • Population in 1996: 13,632
  • Population in 1991: 13,783

Climate[edit]

Amos has, as is typical for this part of Canada, a humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dfb), just above a subarctic climate, with warm summers, very cold winters and heavy precipitation for most of the year.

Climate data for Amos
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 8.3
(46.9)
11.0
(51.8)
21.7
(71.1)
29.0
(84.2)
32.2
(90)
37.2
(99)
37.2
(99)
35.6
(96.1)
32.8
(91)
26.7
(80.1)
20.0
(68)
14.5
(58.1)
37.2
(99)
Average high °C (°F) −11.7
(10.9)
−9.0
(15.8)
−2.2
(28)
6.4
(43.5)
15.6
(60.1)
21.0
(69.8)
23.1
(73.6)
21.3
(70.3)
15.4
(59.7)
8.0
(46.4)
−0.6
(30.9)
−8.5
(16.7)
6.6
(43.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) −17.3
(0.9)
−15.2
(4.6)
−8.2
(17.2)
0.9
(33.6)
9.3
(48.7)
14.7
(58.5)
17.2
(63)
15.6
(60.1)
10.5
(50.9)
4.1
(39.4)
−4.0
(24.8)
−13.2
(8.2)
1.2
(34.2)
Average low °C (°F) −22.8
(−9)
−21.3
(−6.3)
−14.1
(6.6)
−4.6
(23.7)
3.0
(37.4)
8.3
(46.9)
11.2
(52.2)
9.9
(49.8)
5.5
(41.9)
0.2
(32.4)
−7.4
(18.7)
−18
(0)
−4.2
(24.4)
Record low °C (°F) −48.9
(−56)
−52.8
(−63)
−42.2
(−44)
−29.4
(−20.9)
−16.7
(1.9)
−5.6
(21.9)
−3.9
(25)
−1.7
(28.9)
−7.2
(19)
−14.4
(6.1)
−33.3
(−27.9)
−47.8
(−54)
−52.8
(−63)
Precipitation mm (inches) 55.1
(2.169)
35.1
(1.382)
52.7
(2.075)
62.6
(2.465)
79.0
(3.11)
96.9
(3.815)
112.8
(4.441)
99.8
(3.929)
110.7
(4.358)
84.4
(3.323)
71.5
(2.815)
57.9
(2.28)
918.4
(36.157)
Rainfall mm (inches) 4.8
(0.189)
2.2
(0.087)
14.3
(0.563)
39.9
(1.571)
77.7
(3.059)
96.9
(3.815)
112.8
(4.441)
99.8
(3.929)
110.2
(4.339)
75.3
(2.965)
29.6
(1.165)
7.3
(0.287)
670.7
(26.406)
Snowfall cm (inches) 50.6
(19.92)
33.0
(12.99)
38.2
(15.04)
22.8
(8.98)
1.3
(0.51)
0.1
(0.04)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.4
(0.16)
9.1
(3.58)
41.8
(16.46)
51.0
(20.08)
248.4
(97.8)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 11.6 8.1 9.4 10.2 12.2 14.1 14.9 14.0 16.7 15.3 13.3 12.5 152.3
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 0.82 0.75 3.2 6.9 12.0 14.1 14.9 14.0 16.6 13.9 5.3 1.4 103.7
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 11.0 7.8 6.9 4.2 0.45 0.03 0 0 0.14 2.6 9.4 11.5 54.0
Mean monthly sunshine hours 81.3 121.4 152.1 173.3 212.8 235.3 249.4 215.6 131.5 83.7 52.9 59.8 1,769
Source: Environment Canada[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reference number 1229 of the Commission de toponymie du Québec (French)
  2. ^ a b "Amos". Répertoire des municipalités (in French). Ministère des Affaires municipales, des Régions et de l'Occupation du territoire. Retrieved 2011-01-14. 
  3. ^ Parliament of Canada Federal Riding History: ABITIBI--TÉMISCAMINGUE (Quebec)
  4. ^ a b "Amos (ville) census profile". 2011 Census data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-05-24. 
  5. ^ a b "Amos (Population centre) census profile". 2011 Census data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-05-24. 
  6. ^ a b "Amos (Census agglomeration) census profile". 2011 Census data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-05-24.  The census agglomeration consists of Amos, Pikogan, Saint-Dominique-du-Rosaire, Saint-Félix-de-Dalquier, Saint-Mathieu-d'Harricana, Sainte-Gertrude-Manneville, Trécesson. In the 2006 census, the census agglomeration had not included Saint-Félix-de-Dalquier, but had included Landrienne and Saint-Marc-de-Figuery.
  7. ^ a b Environment Canada, Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000. Retrieved March 31, 2012.
  8. ^ "Quebec Lithium". Canada Lithium Corp. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  9. ^ Territorial Division Act. Revised Statutes of Quebec D-11.
  10. ^ "Amos (Census agglomeration) community profile". 2006 Census data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-05-24. 
  11. ^ Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006, 2011 census

External links[edit]