Amy Ellis

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Amy Burns Ellis is an Associate Professor[1] in Mathematics Education in the department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[2]

Education[edit]

Ellis received her BA in Mathematics (with a minor in Japanese) from Washington University in Saint Louis in 1993, and her MA in Mathematics from San Jose State University in 1998. She received her PhD in Mathematics and Science Education in May, 2004, from the University of California at San Diego and San Diego State University. Her dissertation was titled "Relationships Between Generalizing and Justifying: Students’ Reasoning with Linear Functions."[3]

Publications[edit]

Ellis has published articles in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education,[4][5][6] Cognition and Instruction,[7] The Journal of the Learning Sciences,[8] Science,[9] and various other journals.[10] In addition, Ellis has co-authored three books for the Essential Understandings Project book series by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, one published in 2010[11] one in 2011,[12] and one in 2012.[13]

Research funding[edit]

Ellis is a principal investigator on a variety of research projects, and has received numerous grants from the National Science Foundation,[14][15][16][17] as well as other funding agencies.[10]

Honors received[edit]

Ellis was awarded the Early Career Publication Award from the Research in Mathematics Education special interest group of the American Educational Research Association in 2008.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wisconsin.edu/bor/agenda/2012/june.pdf
  2. ^ http://ci.education.wisc.edu/ci/people/faculty/amy-ellis
  3. ^ Ellis, A.B. (2004). Relationships Between Generalizing and Justifying: Students’ Reasoning with Linear Functions. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation.) University of California, San Diego and San Diego State University.
  4. ^ Ellis, A.B. (2011). Generalizing promoting actions: How classroom collaborations can support students’ mathematical generalizations. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 42(4), 308 – 345
  5. ^ Ellis, A.B. (2007). Connections between generalizing and justifying: Students’ reasoning with linear relationships. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 38(3), 194 – 229.
  6. ^ Lobato, J., Clarke, D., & Ellis, A.B. (2005). Initiating and eliciting in teaching: A reformulation of telling. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 36(2), 101–136
  7. ^ Ellis, A.B. (2007). The influence of reasoning with emergent quantities on students’ generalizations. Cognition and Instruction, 25(4), 439–478.
  8. ^ Ellis, A.B. (2007). A taxonomy for categorizing generalizations: Generalizing actions and reflection generalizations. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 16(2), 221 – 262.
  9. ^ Hyde, J., Lindberg, S., Linn, M., Ellis, A.B., & Williams, C. (2008). Gender similarities characterize math performance. Science, 321(5888), 494 – 495.
  10. ^ a b http://www.education.wisc.edu/ci/mathEd/people/ellis_CV.pdf
  11. ^ Lobato, J., & Ellis, A.B. (2010). Essential understandings project: Ratios, proportions, and proportional reasoning (Gr. 6 – 8). National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  12. ^ Lannin, J., Ellis, A.B., & Elliott, R. (2011). Essential understandings project: Mathematical reasoning (Gr. K – 8). National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  13. ^ Bieda, K., Ellis, A.B., & Knuth, E. (2012). Essential understandings project: Proof and proving (grades 9–12). National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  14. ^ Understanding and Cultivating the Connections Between Students’ Natural Ways of Reasoning and Mathematical Ways of Reasoning. In collaboration with Eric Knuth (principal investigator) and Charles Kalish (co-principal investigator) at U.W. Madison. $741,938 from the National Science Foundation Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE), 2008 – 2011. http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0814710
  15. ^ Supporting Students’ Proof Practices through Quantitative Reasoning in Algebra. $730,417 from the National Science Foundation CAREER program through Discovery Research K–12 (DRK12), 2010 – 2015. http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0952415
  16. ^ New Trends in Gender and Mathematics Performance: Meta-Analytic Synthesis. In collaboration with Janet Hyde (principal investigator) at U.W. Madison, and Marcia Linn (co-principal investigator) at U.W. Berkeley]. $199,838 from the National Science Foundation Synthesis Research Program, 2006 – 2009. http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0635444
  17. ^ Coordinating Social and Individual Aspects of Generalizing Activity: A Multi-tiered “Focusing Phenomena” Study. In collaboration with Joanne Lobato (principal investigator) at San Diego State University]. $577,468 at the U.W. site from the National Science Foundation Research on Learning and Education (RoLE), 2005 – 2008. http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0529502
  18. ^ The American Educational Research Association Special Interest Group of Research in Mathematics Education Newsletter (Summer 2008). http://www.sigrme.org/newsletters/summer08_news.pdf