An Inconvenient Tax

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An Inconvenient Tax
An Inconvenient Tax FilmPoster.jpeg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Christopher P. Marshall
Produced by Nathaniel Thomas McGill
Vincent Vittorio
Written by Vincent Vittorio
Starring Noam Chomsky
Ron Paul
Steve Forbes
Mike Huckabee
Herman Cain
David Walker
Charles Rossotti
Joseph Thorndike
Michael Graetz
Daniel Shaviro
Leonard Burman
Music by Lewis Hurrell
Cinematography Nathaniel Thomas McGill
Release dates
  • April 15, 2010 (2010-04-15)
Running time 78 minutes
Country United States
Language English

An Inconvenient Tax is a 2010 documentary film produced by Life Is My Movie Entertainment. The film explores the history of the income tax in the United States and the causes of its many complexities.

Synopsis[edit]

An Inconvenient Tax examines the Federal Income Tax and how Congress uses the complex tax code to achieve political goals that are unrelated to raising revenue. The result of 95 years of additions, subtractions, deductions, and exclusions, the 62,000 page tax code is so complex that many are voicing their desire to greatly simplify it or to even completely remove it. Currently, tax revenue cannot even pay for government spending. The film follows the progression of taxation through wars, economic booms, and significant presidencies in U.S. history. An Inconvenient Tax includes commentary from some of the country's most popular conservative economic experts, commentators, and political voices. Noam Chomsky, Ron Paul, Steve Forbes, Joseph Thorndike, Mike Huckabee, Charles Rossotti, David Walker, Neal Boortz, Herman Cain, Michael Graetz, Daniel Shaviro, Leonard Burman, and others discuss perceived problems in the American tax code, and also suggest possible changes. The possible solutions discussed include the FairTax, flat tax, and value added tax (VAT).[1]

An Inconvenient Tax was officially released on Tax Day – April 15, 2010.[2]

Press[edit]

  • On April 11, 2011, Life Is My Movie Entertainment announced that An Inconvenient Tax had been acquired by Gravitas Ventures and would be distributed through cable, satellite, telco, and online Video-on-Demand (VOD) in June of that year.
  • On July 4, 2011, LIMM announced that the film would be available for international release through Octapixx Worldwide.

Reception[edit]

The film received positive reviews from mainly right-leaning critics. The Swash, a libertarian news site, called the film a “must see, especially to those who are actually ignorant of what it really is, how it came to be and how it should be.”[3] Another conservative critic said that it was a great way to “learn quite a bit in a fairly enjoyable fashion.”[4] Director Christopher P. Marshall and producer Vincent Vittorio were interviewed on FOX Business Channel’s Stossel show with John Stossel on April 15, 2011.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Long Synopsis". An Inconvenient Tax. 
  2. ^ "Screening". An Inconvenient Tax. 
  3. ^ "Review: An Inconvenient Tax". The Swash. 
  4. ^ "An Inconvenient Tax-Review". Chris of Rights. 
  5. ^ http://lifeismymovie.com/someone-elses-life-4/

External links[edit]