Public Law 113–10

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Great Seal of the United States
Full title To specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins.
Introduced in 113th United States Congress
Introduced on March 12, 2013
Sponsored by Rep. Richard L. Hanna (R, NY-22)
Number of Co-Sponsors 2
Effects and Codifications
Act(s) affected National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act
Legislative history

The bill entitled To specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins (Pub.L. 113–10, H.R. 1071) became a law on May 17, 2013 during the 113th United States Congress. It was first introduced in the United States House of Representatives on March 12, 2013 by Rep. Richard L. Hanna (R-NY). The bill corrects a technical problem in a previous law dealing with commemorative coins.

Background[edit]

According to a summary by the House Republicans, the bill was merely to correct a technical error made in the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act.[1]

Provisions/Elements of the bill[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.[2]

The new law amends the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act (Pub.L. 112–152, H.R. 2527) to modify the requirements for the production of gold and silver coins commemorating the National Baseball Hall of Fame to require such coins to be struck on planchets of specified diameters.

Procedural history[edit]

House[edit]

The bill was first introduced in the United States House of Representatives on March 12, 2013, by Rep. Richard L. Hanna (R-NY).[3] It was referred to the United States House Committee on Financial Services. On April 24, 2013, it passed by a simple voice vote.

Senate[edit]

The bill was received in the United States Senate on April 25, 2013.[3] On May 7, 2013, the bill passed the Senate by Unanimous consent.

President[edit]

The bill was presented to President of the United States Barack Obama on May 9, 2013.[3] It was signed into law by him on May 17, 2013.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "H.R. 1071 Legislative Digest". House Republicans. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "H.R. 1071 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "H.R. 1071 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Government.