Anarta

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This article is about the historical region. For the mythological kingdom, see Anarta Kingdom. For the noctuid moth genus, see Anarta (moth).

Anarta (Sanskrit: आनर्त, Ānarta) was an ancient Indian region which corresponded to the present-day North Kathiawar region of Gujarat state[1]

Anarta in the Puranic literature[edit]

According to the Puranic accounts, this region was ruled by the Sharyata dynasty rulers, who claimed their descent from Sharyati, a son of Vaivasvata Manu. The kingdom was named after Anarta, the son of Sharyati. The capital of this kingdom was Kushasthali (the ancient name of Dwaraka). The last ruler of this dynasty was Kakudmi. After him, it was occupied by the Punyajana Rakshasas.[2] Later, the Yadavas migrated to this region under the leadership of Krishna.[3]

Sage Chyavana was also connected with Sharyati and Anarta. He married Sukanya, daughter of Sharyati and sacrificed for him.[4] His descendants were associated with the Haihayas, which occupied the neighbouring region, apparently after the demise of the Sharyata kingdom.[5]

Anarta under Saka rule[edit]

The Junagarh rock inscription of the Saka ruler Rudradaman I mentions Anarta as a part of his kingdom. He placed Anarta under his Pahlava (Parthian) Amatya (minister) Suvishakha, who re-built a dam on the Sudarshana Lake there.[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mahajan, V.D. (1960, reprint 2007). Ancient India, New Delhi: S. Chand, ISBN 81-219-0887-6, p.423
  2. ^ Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.98
  3. ^ Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.282
  4. ^ Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.194
  5. ^ Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.304
  6. ^ Raychaudhuri, H.C. (1972). Political History of Ancient India, Calcutta: Univsrsity of Calcutta, pp.447, 449

External links[edit]