Ancient Egyptian flint jewelry

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Flint jewelry was known in prehistoric, protodynastic, and early dynastic Egypt. Ancient Egyptians skillfully made bracelets[1][2] and armlets[3][4] out of flint.

The flint came from locations that include Giza and Upper Egypt.[5] The exact technique used to form rings is not known, but there are several theories based on the examples that have been found in graves and workshops.

Flint bracelets can be found in collections such as those in the Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities,[6] the Fitzwilliam Museum,[7] the Pitt Rivers Museum,[8] the Metropolitan Museum of Art,[9] and the Brooklyn Museum.[10]

See also related pages[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Graves-Brown, Carolyn (2010). "AB29 Flint bracelet". Egypt Centre. Swansea University. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  2. ^ Capart, Jean (2010). Primitive Art in Egypt. Forgotten Books. pp. 49–51. ISBN 9781451000009. 
  3. ^ Petrie, W. M. Flinders (2003). Arts and Crafts of Ancient Egypt. p. 81. ISBN 9780766128347. 
  4. ^ "Notes and News: The Burnt House at Siitagroi During the summer of 1968 and 1969". Antiquity 44 (174): 131–148. June 1970. ISSN 0003-598X. OCLC 1481624. (subscription required)
  5. ^ Pawlik, Alfred F. (13–17 September 1999). "The Lithic industry of the Pharaonic site Kom al-Ahmar in Middle Egypt and its relationship to the flint mines of the Wadi al-Sheikh". In Weisgerber, Gerd. Stone Age – Mining Age. Proceedings of the VIII International Flint Symposium. Bochum, Germany. pp. 240–206. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  6. ^ Thomas, Ernest S. (December 2006). "Short Guide to the Chief Exhibits of the Cairo Museum of Antiquities (Electronic Edition)". Rice University. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  7. ^ "Flint bracelet". Fitzwilliam Museum. University of Cambridge. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  8. ^ Asbury, Beth. "Rethinking Pitt-Rivers". Pitt Rivers Museum. University of Oxford. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  9. ^ "Flint bracelet". Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  10. ^ "Flint bracelet". Brooklyn Museum. Retrieved 11 June 2012.