Andover (UK Parliament constituency)

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Andover
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
1586–1885
Number of members two (1586-1868); one (1868-1885)
Hampshire, Western or Andover Division
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
18851918
Number of members one

Andover was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England from 1295 to 1307, and again from 1586, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was a parliamentary borough in Hampshire, represented by two Members of Parliament until 1868, and by one member from 1868 to 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP from 1885 until 1918.

History[edit]

The parliamentary borough of Andover, in the county of Hampshire (or as it was still sometimes known before about the eighteenth centuries, Southamptonshire), sent MPs to the parliaments of 1295 and 1302-1307. It was re-enfranchised as a two member constituency in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. It elected MPs regularly from 1586.

The House of Commons decided, in 1689, that the elective franchise for the seat was limited to the twenty four members of the Andover corporation and not the freemen of the borough. This ruling was confirmed after another disputed election in 1727. Matthew Skinner and Abel Kettleby received the most votes, from many householders, but James Brudenell and Charles Colyear (Viscount Milsington) were declared elected for winning the most support from corporation members. Under the Reform Act 1832 the electorate was expanded by allowing householders, whose property was valued at £10 or more, to vote. There were 246 registered electors in 1832.

From the United Kingdom general election, 1868 the constituency returned one member. The electorate was further extended, in 1868, to 775 registered electors.

Apart from the period between 1653 and 1658, Andover continued to be represented as a borough constituency until that was abolished in 1885. Immediately thereafter, from the United Kingdom general election, 1885, the town of Andover was combined with surrounding rural territory to form a county division of Hampshire, known formally as the Western or Andover division. The registered electorate for the expanded seat was 9,175 in 1885, and 9,460 in 1901.[1]

The constituency was abolished in 1918, when the Municipal Borough of Andover and Andover Rural District were included in the Basingstoke seat.

Boundaries[edit]

The constituency was based on the northern Hampshire town of Andover.

The Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832 (2 & 3 William IV, c. 64) defined the seat as "the respective parishes of Andover and Knights Enham, and the tithing of Foxcot". The boundaries were left unaltered, until the end of the borough constituency in 1885.

Under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, the county division was defined as including the Sessional Divisions of Andover, and Kingsclere; with parts of the Sessional Divisions of Winchester, Romsey, and Basingstoke, and the Municipal Boroughs of Andover and Winchester, and the parish of Coombe, Hampshire in the Hungerford Sessional Division of Berkshire.

Members of Parliament[edit]

The Roman numerals after some names are to distinguish different members for this constituency, with the same name. It is not suggested this use of Roman numerals was applied at the time.

  • In this section by-elections are indicated by an asterisk after the date.

Parliament of England 1586-1707 (two members)[edit]

As there were sometimes significant gaps between Parliaments held in this period, the dates of first assembly and dissolution are given. Where the name of the member has not yet been ascertained or (before 1558) is not recorded in a surviving document, the entry unknown is entered in the table.

Elected Assembled Dissolved First Member Second Member
1586 13 October 1586 23 March 1587 Edwin Sandys James Hawley
1588 4 February 1589 29 March 1589 Thomas Temple Henry Reade
1593 18 February 1593 10 April 1593 Miles Sandys Edward Barker
1597 24 October 1597 9 February 1598 Edward Reynolds Edward Phelips
1601 27 October 1601 19 December 1601 Henry Ludlow Nicholas Hyde
1604 19 March 1604 9 February 1611 Sir Thomas Jermyn Thomas Antrobus
1614 5 April 1614 7 June 1614 Richard Venables Peter Noyes
1620 or 1621 16 January 1621 8 February 1622 Robert Wallop John Shuter
1623 or 1624 12 February 1624 27 March 1625 Robert Wallop John Shuter
1625 17 May 1625 12 August 1625 Sir Henry Wallop Henry Shuter
1626 6 February 1626 15 June 1626 Henry Lord Paulett John Shuter
1628 17 March 1628 10 March 1629 Robert Wallop Ralph Conway
1640 13 April 1640 5 May 1640 Robert Wallop Sir Richard Wynn
1640 3 November 1640 5 December 1648 Robert Wallop Sir Henry Rainsford [2]
1641 * Henry Vernon [3]
3 May 1642 [4] Sir William Waller [5]
6 December 1648 [6] 20 April 1653 [7] Seat vacant
1653 [8] 4 July 1653 12 December 1653 unrepresented
1654 3 September 1654 22 January 1655 John Duns
1656 17 September 1656 4 February 1658 Thomas Hussey
1658 or 1659 27 January 1659 22 April 1659 Colonel Gabriel Beck Robert Gough
N/A [9] 7 May 1659 20 February 1660 Robert Wallop Seat vacant
21 February 1660 16 March 1660 Sir William Waller
1660, April 20 25 April 1660 29 December 1660 Sir John Trott, Bt John Collins
1661 8 May 1661 24 January 1679 Sir John Trott, Bt [10] John Collins
1673, January 31 * Sir Kingsmill Lucy, Bt [11]
1678, October 29 * Charles West
1679, February 11 6 March 1679 12 July 1679 Francis Powlett William Wither
1679, August 14 21 October 1680 18 January 1681 Francis Powlett Sir Robert Henley
1681, March 4 21 March 1681 28 March 1681 Charles West Sir John Collins
1685, March 16 19 May 1685 2 June 1687 Robert Phelips Sir John Collins
1689, January 14 22 January 1689 6 February 1690 Francis Powlett John Pollen II
1690, March 3 20 March 1690 11 October 1695 Francis Powlett (Whig) [12] John Pollen II (Tory)
1695, October 30 22 November 1695 6 July 1698 John Smith (Whig) Sir Robert Smyth, Bt (Whig)
1698, July 21 24 August 1698 19 December 1700 John Smith (Whig) Anthony Henley (Whig)
1701, January 14 6 February 1701 11 November 1701 John Smith (Whig) Francis Shepheard (Whig) [13]
1701, November 25 30 December 1701 2 July 1702 John Smith (Whig) Francis Shepheard (Whig)
1702, July 16 20 August 1702 5 April 1705 John Smith (Whig) Francis Shepheard (Whig)
1705, May 11 14 June 1705 1707 [14] John Smith (Whig) Francis Shepheard (Whig)

1707–1868 (two members)[edit]

Date First member First party Second member Second party
1707, October 23 [15] John Smith Whig Francis Shepheard Whig
1708, May 6 William Guidott Whig
1713, August 25 Sir Ambrose Crowley [16] Tory
1714, March 30 * Gilbert Searle Tory
1715, January 29 * John Wallop
1715, April 1 James Brudenell
1727, August 23 Viscount Milsington [17]
1730, January 20 * William Guidott
1734, April 25 John Pollen III
1741, May 5 Hon. John Wallop [18] Whig
1749, November 28 * Sir John Griffin
1754, April 16 Sir Francis Blake Delaval
1768, March 21 Benjamin Lethieullier
1784, August 11 * William Fellowes
1796, May 25 Hon. Coulson Wallop
1797, December 14 * Thomas Assheton Smith I [19] Tory
1802, July 5 Hon. Newton Fellowes Whig
1820, March 8 Sir John Pollen, 2nd Bt Tory
1821, May 11 * Thomas Assheton Smith II Tory
1831, May 2 Henry Arthur Wallop Fellowes Whig Ralph Etwall Whig
1832 Liberal + Liberal +
1835, January 8 Sir John Pollen, 2nd Bt Conservative
1841, June 29 Lord William Paget Liberal +
1847, July 29 Henry Beaumont Coles Conservative William Cubitt [20] Conservative
1857, March 28 Hon. Dudley Fortescue Liberal +
1861, July 29 * Henry Beaumont Coles [21] Conservative
1862, December 17 * William Cubitt [22] Conservative
1863, November 18 * William Humphery [23] Conservative
1867, February 11 * Sir John Burgess Karslake Conservative
1868 constituency reduced to one member
  • In this sub-section Liberal MPs elected before the formal founding of the Liberal Party, in 1859, are indicated by a + symbol after the party name.[24]

1868-1918 (one member)[edit]

Election Member Party Note
1868 Hon. Dudley Fortescue Liberal
1874, February 9 Henry Wellesley Conservative
1880, April 1 Francis Buxton Liberal
1885, December 1 William Wither Bramston Beach Conservative Re-elected unopposed 1886, 1892, 1895, 1900; died 3 August 1901
1901, August 26 * Edmund Faber Conservative
1906, January 23 Walter Vavasour Faber Conservative Last MP for the constituency
1918 constituency abolished

Election results[edit]

General Election 1880: Abingdon
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Francis William Buxton 405 52.7
Conservative Lieutenant Colonel Henry Wellesley 364 47.3
Majority 41 5.3
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
General Election 1885: Andover[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Francis William Buxton 3,108 40.5
Conservative William Wither Beach 4,559 59.5
Majority 1,451 19
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
By-election 26 Aug 1901: Andover[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Edmund Beckett Faber 3,696 51.6
Liberal George Judd 3,473 48.4
Majority 223 3.2
Conservative hold Swing

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Election intelligence" The Times (London). Tuesday, 27 August 1901. (36544), p. 4.
  2. ^ Rainsford died April 1641
  3. ^ On petition, Vernon's election was declared void. The returning officer had given his casting vote to Vernon after he tied in votes with Sir William Waller, but Waller would have won had one of his supporters not been prevented from voting (on the grounds that he had not been sworn in as a burgess). After Vernon's election was declared void without a division, the House voted 107-102 to recognise Waller as duly elected.
  4. ^ Date on which the House of Commons resolved that Henry Vernon's election in 1641 was void and that Waller was duly elected
  5. ^ Waller was disabled from membership in January 1648 at the instigation of the army, but this order was revoked in June 1648; he was excluded permanently in Pride's Purge, December 1648
  6. ^ Date of Pride's Purge, which converted the Long Parliament into the Rump Parliament.
  7. ^ Date when Oliver Cromwell dissolved the Rump Parliament by force.
  8. ^ Date when the members of the nominated or Barebones Parliament were selected. Andover was not represented in this body, except as part of Hampshire.
  9. ^ The Rump Parliament was recalled and subsequently Pride's Purge was reversed, allowing the full Long Parliament to meet until it agreed to dissolve itself.
  10. ^ Trott died 14 July 1672
  11. ^ Lucy died 19 September 1678
  12. ^ Powlett died c. August 1695. Seat vacant at the dissolution.
  13. ^ On petition, Shepheard was "discharged from membership" on 19 March 1701. No new writ was issued and the seat was vacant at the dissolution.
  14. ^ The MPs of the last Parliament of England and 45 members co-opted from the former Parliament of Scotland, became the House of Commons of the 1st Parliament of Great Britain which assembled on 23 October 1707 (see below for the members in that Parliament).
  15. ^ Co-opted, not elected, to the Parliament of Great Britain
  16. ^ Crowley died 7 October 1713
  17. ^ Milsington succeeeded as the 2nd Earl of Portmore in January 1730.
  18. ^ Styled Viscount Lymington from 11 October 1743; died 19 November 1749.
  19. ^ Stooks Smith suggests that Thomas Assheton Smith I's term was interrupted by Henry Smith, in the 1812-18 Parliament. However Rayment does not mention such an additional MP. T. A. Smith resigned 1821
  20. ^ Cubitt resigned in 1861, to contest a City of London by-election (which he lost).
  21. ^ Coles died 23 November 1862.
  22. ^ Cubitt died 28 October 1863.
  23. ^ Humphery resigned, 1867.
  24. ^ F. W. S. Craig classified Whig, Radical and similar candidates, as Liberals from 1832. Other sources may classify all these groups as Whigs. The term Liberal gradually developed as a description for the Whigs and allies, until the formal creation of the Liberal Party shortly after the United Kingdom general election, 1859.
  25. ^ a b "Election intelligence" The Times (London). Wednesday, 28 August 1901. (36545), p. 4.

References[edit]

  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (The Macmillan Press 1977)
  • D Brunton & D H Pennington, Members of the Long Parliament (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1954)
  • Cobbett's Parliamentary history of England, from the Norman Conquest in 1066 to the year 1803 (London: Thomas Hansard, 1808) [1]
  • Maija Jansson (ed.), Proceedings in Parliament, 1614 (House of Commons) (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1988) [2]
  • J E Neale, The Elizabethan House of Commons (London: Jonathan Cape, 1949)
  • J Holladay Philbin, Parliamentary Representation 1832 - England and Wales (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965)
  • The House of Commons 1690-1715, by Eveline Cruickshanks, Stuart Handley and D.W. Hayton (Cambridge University Press 2002)
  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844-50), second edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973)
  • Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "A" (part 2)[self-published source][better source needed]