André Franco Montoro

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André Franco Montoro
Francomontoro.JPG
President of the
Brazilian Social Democracy Party
In office
25 June 1988 – 1 September 1991
Preceded by Party founded
Succeeded by Tasso Jereissati
27th Governor of São Paulo
In office
15 March 1983 – 15 March 1987
Vice Governor Orestes Quércia
Preceded by José Maria Marin
Succeeded by Orestes Quércia
Minister of Labour and Social Security
In office
8 September 1961 – 12 July 1962
President João Goulart
Prime Minister Tancredo Neves
Preceded by Segadas Viana
Succeeded by Almino Afonso
Member of the Federal Senate
In office
1 February 1971 – 15 March 1983
Constituency São Paulo
Member of the Chamber of Deputies
In office
1 February 1995 – 16 July 1999
Constituency São Paulo
In office
12 July 1962 – 1 February 1966
Constituency São Paulo
In office
1 February 1959 – 8 September 1961
Constituency São Paulo
Personal details
Born (1916-07-14)14 July 1916
São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Died 16 July 1999(1999-07-16) (aged 83)
São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Political party Brazilian Social Democracy Party
Spouse(s) Lucy Franco Montoro
Children Maria Lúcia, André, Eugenio Augusto, Paulo Guilherme, José Ricardo, Fernando, Monica
Occupation Lawyer

André Franco Montoro (Portuguese: [ɐ̃ˈdrɛ ˈfrãku mõˈtoru]; 14 July 1916 – 16 July 1999) was a Brazilian politician and lawyer. He was born in São Paulo as the son of André de Blois Montoro and Tomásia Alijostes. He was a senator and governor of São Paulo. He was a member of several parties, such as PDC, MDB, PMDB and one of the founders of PSDB. He was also a law philosopher and a professor at PUC-SP, who wrote several law books.

Montoro is credited as being one of the key figures in the Diretas Já movement, along with Tancredo Neves and Ulysses Guimarães, which helped to bring about the return of direct elections to Brazil.

The São Paulo-Guarulhos International Airport is named after him.

Government offices
Preceded by
José Maria Marin
Governor of São Paulo
1983–1987
Succeeded by
Orestes Quércia