André Méric

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André Méric (August 14, 1913 – August 14, 1993)[1] was a French politician who has been Senator of Haute-Garonne from 1948 to 1988 and President of Socialist group in the Senate from 1980 to 1988.

Biography[edit]

Committed as a teenager in the Young Socialists, André Méric equally among early in life. Apprentice mechanic, the young André forms to become accountant, qualifying it gets on the eve of his departure for military service in 1939. After the armistice, he joined the Resistance, but he was arrested and deported to the camp of Rava-Ruska, in East Prussia. After the Liberation, he was elected to the General Council of Haute-Garonne and became, three years later, the youngest senator of France at thirty-five years. He was also elected mayor of Calmont in 1955.

Vice-President of the Council of the Republic and the Senate from 1956 to 1980, he replaced Alain Poher at the head of the Upper House in 1969 when he became interim President of the Republic. In 1980, the socialist senators chose to chair the group. The following year, Andre Meric is part of the political council of the Socialist Party nominee in presidential elections, François Mitterrand.

In 1987, he was appointed Vice-Chairman of the Committee to Review the draft resolution on the indictment before the High Court of Justice of Christian Nucci, former Under-Minister for Cooperation and Development. In 1988, he joined the second Rocard government as Secretary of State for Veterans and War Victims and passed a special status for the prisoners of the Viet Minh during the Indochina War. In 1991, he announced his retirement from politics.

Political offices
Preceded by
Alain Poher
Acting President of the Senate
1969
Succeeded by
Alain Poher
Preceded by
Marcel Champeix
Leader of Socialist Group in the Senate
1980–1988
Succeeded by
Claude Estier
Leader of the Opposition in the Senate
1980–1988
Preceded by
Jacques Mellick
Secretary of State for Veterans and War Victims
1988–1991
Succeeded by
Louis Mexandeau

References[edit]