André Parrot

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André Parrot (1901–1980) was a French archaeologist specializing in the ancient Near East. He led excavations in Lebanon, Iraq and Syria, and is best known for his work at Mari, Syria, where he led important excavations from 1933[1] to 1975.

Biography[edit]

Parrot was born in 1901 in Désandans in the French department of Doubs. He was appointed chief curator of the National Museums in 1946, and became director of the Louvre[2] from 1958 to 1962.[3] He was a Commander of the Legion of Honour and a member of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres. He married Marie-Louise Girod in 1960, and died in Paris in 1980.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Mari, a lost city (1936)
  • Mesopotamian Archaeology (1946–1953)
  • The Temple of Jerusalem (1957)
  • Sumer (1960)
  • Assur (1961)
  • Abraham and His Times (1962, Oxford UP)
  • The Treasure of Ur (1968)
  • The Art of Sumer (1970)
  • The excavations of Mari, 18th and 19th campaigns (1970–1971)
  • Mari, fabulous capital (1974)
  • Archaeology (1976) (ISBN 2-228-89009-X)
  • Archaeological Adventure (1979) (ISBN 2-221-00392-6)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Parrot, André (1935). "Les fouilles de Mari (Première campagne)". Syria (in French) (Institut français du Proche-Orient) 16 (1): 1–28. doi:10.3406/syria.1935.8338. 
  2. ^ "Deaths elsewhere". St Petersburg Times. 26 August 1980. Retrieved 6 January 2011. 
  3. ^ "André Parrot", in Je m'appelle Byblos, Jean-Pierre Thiollet, H & D, 2005, p. 256.