Andrea di Aloigi

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Holy Conversation, attributed to Andrea di Aloigi, now in the Musée Condé.

Andrea di Aloigi (or Alovigi, Aloisi, Aloysii, and Di Luigi; 1480 - 1521), called L'Ingegno, was an Italian Renaissance painter.

Life[edit]

A native of Assisi, he is said by biographer Giorgio Vasari to have been a fellow-pupil with Raphael under Perugino, and to have assisted the latter in the Collegio del Cambio at Perugia, at Assisi, and in the Sistine Chapel. Some of the figures in Perugino's Moses Leaving to Egypt in the chapel have been attributed to him.[1]

Ingegno, Vasari adds, became blind, and received a pension from Pope Sixtus IV. This last statement, as Carl Friedrich von Rumohr pointed out, is an error, as the Pope died in 1484, and Raphael did not enter Perugino's studio until about 1496. Most of his works are in the manner of Fiorenzo di Lorenzo.[2] A Virgin and Child in the National Gallery in London is attributed to him; an inscription on the painting reading "A.A.P." has been taken to mean "Andrea di Aloigi (or possibly Andrea da Assisi) painted this".[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bryan 1886 -9.
  2. ^ Bryan 1886-9.
  3. ^ "The Virgin and Child". National Gallery. Retrieved 16 October 2012. 

Sources[edit]

This article incorporates text from the article "ALOVIGI, Andrea" in Bryan's Dictionary of Painters and Engravers by Michael Bryan, edited by Robert Edmund Graves and Sir Walter Armstrong, an 1886–1889 publication now in the public domain.

External links[edit]