Andreas Beck (tennis)

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Andreas Beck
Beck A. WMQ14 (5) (14420461839).jpg
Country  Germany
Residence Ravensburg, Germany
Born (1986-02-05) February 5, 1986 (age 28)
Weingarten, Germany
Height 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro 2003
Plays Left-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $1,322,797
Singles
Career record 41–60
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 33 (November 2, 2009)
Current ranking No. 100 (September 8, 2014)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (2009, 2012)
French Open 2R (2009, 2010)
Wimbledon 2R (2010)
US Open 2R (2008, 2009, 2010)
Doubles
Career record 22–26
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 116 (January 30, 2012)
Current ranking No. 177 (December 30, 2013)
Last updated on: January 4, 2014.

Andreas Beck (born February 5, 1986 in Weingarten) is a German professional male tennis player. He achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 33 in November 2009. As a qualifier, Beck reached the quarterfinals of the 2009 Monte Carlo Masters.

Professional career[edit]

2008[edit]

In June, Beck qualified for the 2008 Wimbledon Championships, beating No. 218 Paolo Lorenzi, No. 194 Brendan Evans, and No. 280 Jaroslav Pospíšil. In his first round match he played World No. 2 Rafael Nadal on Centre Court, losing in straight sets.

2009[edit]

In the Monte-Carlo Masters, Beck entered as a qualifier and reached the quarterfinals, defeating sixth seed Gilles Simon and Juan Mónaco along the way. He was defeated by Stanislas Wawrinka in straight sets, the Swiss having beaten countryman and World No. 2 Roger Federer in the previous round. As a result of his performance in this tournament, Beck's ranking climbed 29 places in the ATP rankings to No. 60, while he reached his career-high of World No. 33 later in the year.

Beck reached his first ATP final at the Allianz Suisse Open Gstaad. He was defeated by qualifier Thomaz Bellucci.

Hobbies[edit]

Beck is a self-confessed fan of Chelsea Football Club. He visits Stamford Bridge whenever possible during Wimbledon.

ATP career finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (0–1)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments
ATP World Tour Finals
ATP World Tour Masters 1000
ATP World Tour 500 Series
ATP World Tour 250 Series (0–1)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. August 3, 2009 Allianz Suisse Open Gstaad, Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Brazil Thomaz Bellucci 4–6, 6–7(2–7)

Doubles: 2 (0–2)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments
ATP World Tour Finals
ATP World Tour Masters 1000
ATP World Tour 500 Series
ATP World Tour 250 Series (0–2)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. July 13, 2009 Gerry Weber Open, Halle, Germany Grass Switzerland Michael Lammer Germany Christopher Kas
Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 2. May 1, 2011 BMW Open, München, Germany Clay Germany Christopher Kas Argentina Horacio Zeballos
Italy Simone Bolelli
6–7(3–7), 4–6

Singles Performance Timeline[edit]

To prevent confusion and double counting, information in this table is updated only after a tournament or the player's participation in the tournament has concluded.

Tournament 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 2R A A 2R[a] A Q1 2–1
French Open Q1 2R 2R 1R A 1R 1R 2–5
Wimbledon 1R 1R 2R 1R A A Q2 1–4
US Open 2R 2R 2R Q2 A Q1 1R 3–4
Win–Loss 1–2 3–4 3–3 0–2 1–0 0–1 0–2 8–14
Career Statistics
Titles–Finals 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1
Year End Ranking 109 39 154 98 449 186

a 2012 Australian Open counts as 1 win, 0 loss. (Round 2 Roger Federer walkover after Beck withdrew because of lower back injury[1] does not count as a Beck loss, nor a Federer win.)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walton, Darren (January 18, 2012). "Open irony as Federer gets walkover". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 

External links[edit]