Andreas Goldberger

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Andreas Goldberger
Andreas Goldberger (2011).jpg
Personal information
Full name Andreas Goldberger
Born (1972-11-29) 29 November 1972 (age 42)
Ried im Innkreis, Austria
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)
Professional information
Personal best 225 m (738 ft)
Planica, 18 Mar 2000
World Cup
Seasons 19912005
Wins 20 (+4 Team)
Additional podiums 43 (+8 Team)
Total podiums 63 (+12 Team)
Overall titles 3 (1993, 1995, 1996)
Updated on 30 Mar 2015.

Andreas Goldberger (born 29 November 1972) is an Austrian former ski jumper.

Career[edit]

In a career spanning nearly fifteen years, he won the FIS Ski Jumping World Cup three times (1992–93, 1994–95, 1995–96), the Four Hills Tournament twice (1992–93, 1994–95), with multiple medals in the Ski Jumping World Championships and Winter Olympics.

Despite his success at ski jumping, Goldberger preferred ski flying—a more extreme version of normal ski jumping, in which distances are far greater. In 1994, during training for the Ski Flying World Championships in Planica, he recorded a jump of 202 metres; this made him the first man to ever to jump over 200 metres, but he touched the snow upon landing, thus making the jump invalid as an official world record (Finland's Toni Nieminen would later land a 203 m jump at the same event). In 2000, also at Planica, he jumped 225 m and set a world record which stood until 2003.

World Cup[edit]

Standings[edit]

Season Overall SF JP 4H NT
1990–91 37 14 N/A 47 N/A
1991–92 8 2nd N/A 38 N/A
1992–93 1st 3rd N/A 1st N/A
1993–94 3rd 13 N/A 3rd N/A
1994–95 1st 1st N/A 1st N/A
1995–96 1st 1st 2nd 7 N/A
1996–97 8 5 7 2nd 69
1997–98 17 15 16 4 40
1998–99 17 34 16 9 9
1999–00 5 4 4 5 5
2000–01 14 7 N/A 26 2nd
2001–02 13 N/A N/A 9 16
2002–03 12 N/A N/A 9
2003–04 18 N/A N/A 24 27
2004–05 36 N/A N/A 28 69

Wins[edit]

No. Season Date Place Hill Size
1 1992-93 4 Jan 1993 Austria Innsbruck Bergiselschanze K-109 LH
2 6 Jan 1993 Austria Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze K-120 LH
3 1993-94 17 Dec 1993 France Courchevel Tremplin du Praz K-120 LH
4 4 Jan 1994 Austria Innsbruck Bergiselschanze K-109 LH
5 1994-95 11 Dec 1994 Slovenia Planica Bloudek Normal Hill K-92 NH
6 6 Jan 1995 Austria Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze K-120 LH
7 8 Jan 1995 Germany Willingen Mühlenkopfschanze K-120 LH
8 21 Jan 1995 Japan Sapporo Miyanomori K-90 NH
9 28 Jan 1995 Finland Lahti Salpausselkä K-90 NH
10 8 Feb 1995 Norway Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken K-120 (night) LH
11 12 Feb 1995 Norway Oslo Holmenkollbakken K-110 LH
12 18 Feb 1995 Norway Vikersund Vikersundbakken K-175 FH
13 19 Feb 1995 Norway Vikersund Vikersundbakken K-175 FH
14 25 Feb 1995 Germany Oberstdorf Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze K-182 FH
15 1995-96 4 Jan 1996 Austria Innsbruck Bergiselschanze K-109 LH
16 14 Jan 1996 Switzerland Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze K-120 LH
17 21 Jan 1996 Japan Sapporo Ōkurayama K-115 LH
18 28 Jan 1996 Poland Zakopane Wielka Krokiew K-116 LH
19 11 Feb 1996 Austria Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf Kulm K-185 FH
20 9 Mar 1996 Czech Republic Harrachov Čerťák K-180 FH

Controversy[edit]

In 1997 Goldberger admitted to the use of cocaine, and was given a six-month ban from the Austrian Ski Association. As a result of that ban, in November 1997, he even declared he would, from that moment on, compete under the flag of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.[1] Yet, after reaching an agreement with the Austrian Ski Association, he continued competing for his native Austria.

End of career[edit]

Goldberger last World Cup appearance as a ski jumper was in Lahti on 6 March 2005 (49 place). Goldberger officially retired and ended his career with his final jump as a V-jumper on 13 January 2006 at flying hill in Kulm, Austria. He jumps at World Cup competition as a V-jumper with helmet cam for Austrian national TV station ORF, where he works as a co-commentator.

References[edit]


Records
Preceded by
Thomas Hörl
World's longest ski jump
18 March 2000 – 20 March 2003
Succeeded by
Adam Małysz
Awards
Preceded by
Patrick Ortlieb
Austrian Sportsman of the year
1993
Succeeded by
Thomas Stangassinger
Preceded by
Thomas Muster
Austrian Sportsman of the year
1996
Succeeded by
Toni Polster