Andriy Medvedev

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Andriy Medvedev
Андрій Медведєв
Andrey Medvedev 2012.JPG
Country

 Soviet Union (1991)

 Ukraine (1991–2001)
Residence Monte Carlo, Monaco
Born (1974-08-31) 31 August 1974 (age 40)
Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union
Height 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)
Turned pro 1991
Retired 2001
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $6,721,560
Singles
Career record 321–213
Career titles 11
Highest ranking No. 4 (16 May 1994)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1995)
French Open F (1999)
Wimbledon 4R (1994)
US Open QF (1993)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals SF (1993)
Doubles
Career record 29–37
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 185 (5 July 1993)
Last updated on: 6 May 2012.

Andriy (Andrei) Medvedev (Ukrainian: Андрій Медведєв, born 31 August 1974 in Kiev), is a former professional tennis player from Ukraine. Andriy is the Ukrainian language spelling of his first name, while Andrei is the Russian language spelling of his first name, with both regularly used. Medvedev made a splash on the international tennis scene when, as a 17-year-old, he won titles in Genoa and Stuttgart. His most successful tournament was the Hamburg Masters (formerly the German Open), which he won three times (1994, 1995 and 1997).[1] He reached a career-high singles ranking of World No. 4.

In the late 1990s, Medvedev's form and results began to flounder until he unexpectedly reached the final of the 1999 French Open after having defeated Pete Sampras and Gustavo Kuerten en route.[2] Medvedev dominated the first two sets of the final against Andre Agassi before Agassi mounted a come-from-behind victory, which allowed him to complete a career Grand Slam.[3] Afterwards, Medvedev did not score further notable results, and retired from the tour in 2001.

One main rival of Medvedev's was Sergi Bruguera. While their head-to-head record ended deadlocked at 5–5, Bruguera was able to win their two most important matches — the semi-finals and quarter-finals of the 1993 and 1994 French Opens respectively, with Bruguera winning both matches in straight sets. Medvedev lost six times to the eventual French Open champion (1992–95, 1997 and 1999).

Medvedev's junior career was the highlighted by winning the junior 1991 French Open.

Major finals[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (0–1)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1999 French Open Clay United States Andre Agassi 6–1, 6–2, 4–6, 3–6, 4–6

Masters Series finals[edit]

Singles: 5 (4–1)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1993 Paris Carpet Croatia Goran Ivanišević 4–6, 2–6, 6–7(2–7)
Winner 1994 Monte Carlo Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 7–5, 6–1, 6–3
Winner 1994 Hamburg Clay Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Winner 1995 Hamburg (2) Clay Croatia Goran Ivanišević 6–3, 6–2, 6–1
Winner 1997 Hamburg (3) Clay Spain Félix Mantilla 6–0, 6–4, 6–2

Career finals[edit]

Singles: 18 (11–7)[edit]

Wins (11)
Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (4–1)
ATP Championship Series (3–0)
ATP Tour (4–5)
Titles by Surface
Hard (2–0)
Grass (0–1)
Clay (9–5)
Carpet (0–1)
Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 21 June 1992 Genoa, Italy Clay Argentina Guillermo Pérez-Roldán 6–3, 6–4
Winner 2. 19 July 1992 Stuttgart, Germany Clay South Africa Wayne Ferreira 6–1, 6–4, 6–7(5–7), 2–6, 6–1
Winner 3. 20 September 1992 Bordeaux, France Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 6–3, 1–6, 6–2
Winner 4. 4 April 1993 Estoril, Portugal Clay Czech Republic Karel Nováček 6–4, 6–2
Winner 5. 11 April 1993 Barcelona, Spain Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 6–7(7–9), 6–3, 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 1. 20 June 1993 Halle, Germany Grass France Henri Leconte 2–6, 3–6
Winner 6. 22 August 1993 New Haven, USA Hard Czech Republic Petr Korda 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 2. 7 November 1993 Paris, France Carpet (i) Croatia Goran Ivanišević 4–6, 2–6, 6–7(2–7)
Runner-up 3. 3 April 1994 Estoril, Portugal Clay Spain Carlos Costa 6–4, 5–7, 4–6
Winner 7. 24 April 1994 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 7–5, 6–1, 6–3
Winner 8. 8 May 1994 Hamburg, Germany Clay Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Runner-up 4. 7 August 1994 Prague, Czech Republic Clay Spain Sergi Bruguera 3–6, 4–6
Winner 9. 14 May 1995 Hamburg, Germany Clay Croatia Goran Ivanišević 6–3, 6–2, 6–1
Runner-up 5. 14 July 1996 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Magnus Gustafsson 1–6, 3–6
Winner 10. 25 August 1996 Long Island, USA Hard Czech Republic Martin Damm 7–5, 6–3
Winner 11. 11 May 1997 Hamburg, Germany Clay Spain Félix Mantilla 6–0, 6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 6. 12 July 1998 Båstad, Sweden Clay Sweden Magnus Gustafsson 2–6, 3–6
Runner-up 7. 6 June 1999 French Open, Paris, France Clay United States Andre Agassi 6–1, 6–2, 4–6, 3–6, 4–6

Doubles: 1 (0–1)[edit]

Runner-ups (1)
No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in Final Score in Final
1. 14 November 1999 Moscow, Russia Carpet (I) Russia Marat Safin United States Justin Gimelstob
Czech Republic Daniel Vacek
6–2, 6–1

Singles performance timeline[edit]

Tournament 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slams
Australian Open A A A 3R A QF 2R 4R 2R 2R 1R 2R 0 / 8 13–8
French Open A A 4R SF QF 4R 2R 4R 1R F 4R 1R 0 / 10 29–10
Wimbledon A A A 2R 4R 2R 1R 3R 2R 2R 1R 1R 0 / 9 9–9
US Open A A A QF 2R 2R 4R 1R 2R 4R A A 0 / 7 13–7
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 34 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 3–1 12–4 8–3 9–4 5–4 8–4 3–4 11–4 3–3 1–3 N/A 64–34
Masters Series
Indian Wells A A A A A 2R 1R 1R QF A 1R A 0 / 5 4–5
Miami A A A 3R A QF 3R QF 2R 2R 2R 1R 0 / 8 14–8
Monte Carlo A A A QF W 1R 3R 3R 2R 1R 2R 1R 0 / 9 14–8
Rome A A A 3R 3R 3R QF 1R 1R A 3R 1R 0 / 8 11–8
Hamburg A A A A W W 2R W 1R A 3R 1R 3 / 7 20–4
Canada A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0 0–0
Cincinnati A A A 3R 1R 2R 2R 3R 2R A A A 0 / 6 7–6
Stuttgart A A 2R 1R 1R 2R A 2R A 1R A A 0 / 6 3–6
Paris A A 2R F 1R 2R A A A 2R A A 0 / 5 7–5
Masters Series SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 6 2 / 6 1 / 8 0 / 6 1 / 7 0 / 6 0 / 4 0 / 5 0 / 4 4 / 54 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 2–2 12–6 13–4 15–7 9–6 15–6 6–6 2–4 6–5 0–4 N/A 80–50
Year End Ranking
Ranking 1007 227 24 6 15 16 35 27 62 31 58 156 N/A

Main achievements[edit]

  • 1991 Won junior French Open, beating Thomas Enqvist in the final
  • 1992 Won the title in Stuttgart (Outdoor) with the strongest draw in the history of the event
  • 1993 Semifinalist at the French Open and Masters in Frankfurt
  • 1994 Won the titles in Monte Carlo and Hamburg (Super 9 events)
  • 1995 Won the title in Hamburg
  • 1997 Won the title in Hamburg title for the third time in four years
  • 1999 Reached the final of the French Open

Personal life[edit]

His sister, Natalia Medvedeva, formerly played on the WTA Tour and together they represented Ukraine at the seventh Hopman Cup in 1995, finishing as runners-up to Germany's Boris Becker and Anke Huber (his girlfriend back then) in the final.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sampras earns comeback success. The Independent (17 May 2000)
  2. ^ Finn, Robin (5 June 1999) Medvedev, a Finalist at the French Open, Can Feel the Love. New York Times.
  3. ^ String Quartet. Sportsillustrated.cnn.com (14 June 1999). Retrieved on 22 February 2014.
  4. ^ Past Results – Hopman Cup VII. Hopmancup.com (4 January 2014). Retrieved on 22 February 2014.

External links[edit]