Andrew A. Michta

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Andrew Alexander Michta (born April 4, 1956) is a political scientist. He is bilingual (English and Polish), fluent in Russian, and proficient in German and French.[1] The BBC characterized him as "a well-known expert on security issues."[2]

Michta has a Ph.D. in International Relations from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University (1987).

He is the M.W. Buckman Distinguished Professor of International Studies at Rhodes College, a predominantly undergraduate college in Memphis, Tennessee.[3] There he received the Clarence Day Dean's Award for Outstanding Research.[4][3] He was on leave 2005-09 and 2011-present.

As of May 2011, he is the Senior Transatlantic Fellow and the Director of the Warsaw branch office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States.[5] From 2005-09, he was Professor of National Security Studies and Director of Studies of the Senior Executive Seminar at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Germany.[3] He was a Visiting Scholar at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University; and a Research Associate at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at The George Washington University.[3] From 2000-2001 he was at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. (2000–2001).[6]

He is a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, serves on the Advisory Council of the Center for European Policy Analysis in Washington, D.C., and has served on the AAASS Board of Directors (2001–2004).[7]

The Limits of Alliance: The United States, NATO and the EU in North and Central Europe, was published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2006.[8]

Michta has argued that the United States and NATO missed opportunities after the September 11, 2001 attack to revitalize the NATO alliance. Specifically he argues that NATO should have taken the lead in Afghanistan.[9]

Michta has explored the implications of NATO's institutional effort to use its enlargement process as a means to advance civil-military reform in Eastern Europe. Michta argues that NATO's requirement that all new members must meet specific goals of democratic civilian control over its military was especially successful in reforming Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. He concludes that these three new NATO members have made dramatic efforts to depoliticize their military, in contrast to the political control during the communist era. Thereby the democratic forces in these countries have been strengthened.[10]

Works[edit]

  • The Limits of Alliance[11]
  • The Soldier-Citizen[12][13][14]
  • Polish Foreign Policy Reconsidered[15]
  • East Central Europe after the Warsaw Pact[16]
  • The Government and Politics of Postcommunist Europe[17]
  • America's New Allies: Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic in NATO[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dr. Andrew A. Michta". the German Marshall Fund of the United States. 
  2. ^ "Polish commentary stresses need to "transform" NATO, discusses major "threats", BBC Monitoring European [London] 29 Mar 2009. Quote: "Andrew Michta, a well-know expert on security issues from the George C. Marschall European Centre for Security Studies, believes that the future of NATO..."
  3. ^ a b c d "Andrew Michta Meets with Polish Leaders and Scholars". U.S. Embassy in Warsaw, Poland. 18 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Andrew A. Michta". 
  5. ^ "Andrew A. Michta to join German Marshall Fund as Warsaw office director". German Marshall Fund. 20 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Andrew A. Michta". Rhodes College. 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  7. ^ "Andrew A. Michta". 
  8. ^ "Featured Publications". 
  9. ^ Mark G. Czelusta (2010). Business as Usual: An Assessment of Donald Rumsfeld's Transformation Vision and Transformation's Prospects for the Future. DIANE Publishing. p. 50. 
  10. ^ S. Victor Papacosma et al. (2001). NATO: After Fifty Years. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 18. 
  11. ^ Book review of The Limits of Alliance in the journal Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Vol. 66, No. 2, Summer, 2007.
  12. ^ Book review of The Soldier-Citizen in the journal Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Vol. 58, No. 1, Spring, 1999. Review by: Jerzy J. Wiatr
  13. ^ Book review of The Soldier-Citizen in the journal Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 50, No. 7, Nov., 1998. Review by: Beata Rozumilowicz
  14. ^ Book review of The Soldier-Citizen in the journal Foreign Affairs, May-June 1998 v77 n3 p138(2). Review by: Eliot A. Cohen
  15. ^ Book review of Polish Foreign Policy Reconsidered in the journal Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 48, No. 8, Dec., 1996. Review by: A. J. Prazmowska
  16. ^ Book review of East Central Europe after the Warsaw Pact in the journal Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Vol. 54, No. 2, Summer, 1995. Review by: Robert Ponichtera
  17. ^ Book review of The Government and Politics of Postcommunist Europe in the journal Canadian Slavonic Papers, Vol. 36, No. 3/4, September-De... Review by: Serge Cipko.
  18. ^ Book review of America's New Allies: Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic in NATO in the journal Europe-Asia Studies, March 2001 v53 i2 p361. Review by ANASTASIA V. MITROFANOVA