Andrew C. Skinner

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Andrew C. Skinner (born 1951)[1] was a dean of religious education at Brigham Young University and the author of a wide variety of books and articles on historical and doctrinal topics. Skinner currently serves as the executive director of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship.

Biography[edit]

Skinner grew up in Colorado. From 1970 to 1972 he was a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in the California Central Mission. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Colorado.

Skinner holds a master's degree in theology from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Denver. Prior to joining the faculty of Brigham Young University, Skinner was a religion instructor at Ricks College for four years.

Skinner is the co-author of Jerusalem: The Eternal City. He has written several books related to the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ including The Garden Tomb.[2] Among Skinner's works are several articles on LDS doctrinal topics in the Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History, as well as the article on Abraham Lincoln in that volume.[citation needed] He wrote an article for the LDS magazine "Ensign" entitled The Book of Abraham: A Most Remarkable Book wherein he discusses LDS cosmology.[3] Skinner also wrote the article on Lincoln's Presidency in the Encyclopedia of North American History.[4] He co-authored Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet with Susan Easton Black.

Skinner has served in several positions in the LDS Church including serving multiple times as a bishop. He has also served as a member of the Church's Correlation Evaluation Committee.

Skinner is married to Janet Corbridge. They are the parents of six children.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Jerusalem : the eternal city / David B. Galbraith, D. Kelly Ogden, Andrew...". Copyright Catalog (1978 to present). United States Copyright Office. Retrieved 2011-01-04. 
  2. ^ Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005
  3. ^ Skinner, Andrew (March 1997), "The Book of Abraham: A Most Remarkable Book", Ensign: 16 
  4. ^ Tarrytown, New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp., 1999

References[edit]