Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction

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Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction
Logo of The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction.png
Awarded for Best adult fiction & non-fiction
Sponsor Carnegie Corporation (main sponsor)
Booklist (ALA co-sponsor)
Reference and User Services Association (ALA co-sponsor)
Location ALA Annual Conference
Country USA
Presented by American Library Association
Host American Library Association
Reward $5,000 (winner)
$1,500 (finalists)
First awarded 2012
Official website Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction

The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction were established in 2012 to recognize the best fiction and nonfiction books for adult readers published in the U.S. in the previous year.[1] They are named in honor of nineteenth-century American philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in recognition of his deep belief in the power of books and learning to change the world.[2] The award is supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and administered by the American Library Association (ALA).[1] Booklist and the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) cosponsor the awards.[1] The shortlist and winners are selected by a seven-member selection committee of library experts who work with adult readers.[1] The annually appointed selection committee includes a chair, three Booklist editors or contributors, and three former members of RUSA CODES Notable Books Council.[1]

The winners, one each for fiction and nonfiction, are announced at an event in June at the American Library Association Annual Conference; winning authors receive a $5,000 cash award, and two finalists in each category receive $1,500.[1]

Finalists and winners[edit]

Blue Ribbon (Blue ribbon) = winner.

2012[edit]

Fiction[3][4]

Nonfiction[3][4]

2013[edit]

Fiction[5][6][7]

Nonfiction[5][6][7]

2014[edit]

Fiction[8]

Nonfiction[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction (official website)". Retrieved May 13, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Carnegie Corporation of New York and the American Library Association Announce New Literary Prizes". carnegie.org. March 5, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Neal Wyatt (May 21, 2012). "Wyatt’s World: The Carnegie Medals Short List". Library Journal. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Carolyn Kellogg (June 25, 2012). "First-ever Carnegie Awards in Literature go to Enright, Massie". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 25, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b Bill Ott (June 30, 2013). "Richard Ford and Timothy Egan Win Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction.". Booklist. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b Annalisa Pesek (July 3, 2013). "2013 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". Library Journal. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "ALA Unveils 2013 Finalists for Andrew Carnegie Medals". Publishers Weekly. April 22, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b Hillel Italie (June 30, 2014). "Tartt, Goodwin awarded Carnegie medals". Seattle Times. Associated Press. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 

External links[edit]