Andrew Curnow

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Andrew Curnow
Bishop of Bendigo
Diocese Anglican Diocese of Bendigo, Australia
Installed 28 June 2003
Term ended Incumbent
Predecessor David Bowden
Orders
Ordination 1974
Personal details
Birth name Andrew William Curnow
Born 1950
Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Nationality Australian
Denomination Anglican
Residence Bendigo, Victoria
Spouse Jan Curnow

Andrew William Curnow AM is the ninth bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Bendigo in regional Victoria, Australia.[1] He was enthroned as bishop on 28 June 2003 after a period as an assistant bishop in the Diocese of Melbourne, serving the northern region of the diocese. He has degrees in commerce, divinity and arts. He was ordained as a priest in 1974 and has served in the Bendigo, Melbourne and New York dioceses. His family is of Cornish origins.[2]

Curnow has lived, studied and ministered in widely diverse communities and parishes, ranging from those in rural Victoria (Elmore, Lockington), to regional centres such as Bendigo, Melbourne suburbs (West Coburg, Pascoe Vale South, Kew and Malvern) and overseas in New York and Virginia in the United States and Oxford in England. He is prominent in his concern for welfare issues (through involvement in and leadership of groups such as Anglicare Australia, St Luke's Anglicare, the Brotherhood of St Laurence and welfare services such as New Horizons Welfare Services in Kyneton, Victoria).

Curnow has played significant leadership roles in Christian education in the Council for Christian Education in Schools, at Braemar College and the Melbourne College of Divinity. He has a particular interest in the theology of mission in contemporary Australia on which he has written extensively. He is married to Jan Curnow.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bishop Andrew Curnow New Bishop of Bendigo", Trinity Today, September 2003)
  2. ^ White, George Pawley, A Handbook of Cornish Surnames, Camborne, 1972 (his family is mentioned by Rowse)[clarification needed]
  3. ^ Anglican Communion Directory, March 2000

External links[edit]