Andrew Jameson (politician)

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Andrew Jameson PC (Ire) DL (17 August 1855 – 15 February 1941) was a Scottish-born Irish public servant, politician and businessman.

Jameson was born in Alloa. He was educated at London International College, Trinity College, Cambridge and Trinity College, Dublin.[1] From 1896 to 1898 he was Governor of the Bank of Ireland, remaining a director until 1941. In 1902 he was High Sheriff of County Dublin. He was also chairman of the Irish Lights Commission, which administered lighthouses in Ireland. He was president of the Dublin Chamber of Commerce in 1921–1922.

In 1917 he was a member of the unsuccessful Irish Convention. He was appointed to the Privy Council of Ireland in the 1921 New Year Honours, entitling him to the style "The Right Honourable".

From 1922 to 1936 Jameson served as a Senator of the Irish Free State. As a member of the Memorial Committee set up to establish the Irish National War Memorial Gardens, in December 1930 he advised W. T. Cosgrave, President of the Irish Free State, who was very interested in bringing the memorial to fruition, on the suitability of the site running along the south bank of the River Liffey; this site was eventually decided upon by Cosgrave and agreed by the committee.

Jameson was also chairman of the whiskey distillers John Jameson & Son Ltd.

In 1877 he married Grace (1854–1922), daughter of Dr William Malachy Burke of Loughrea. They had four children.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Jameson, Andrew (JM873A)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

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