Andrew Lang Lecture

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The Andrew Lang Lecture series is held at the University of St. Andrews. The lectures are named after Andrew Lang. The most famous lecture in this series is that given by J. R. R. Tolkien in March 1939, entitled 'Fairy Stories', but published subsequently as 'On Fairy-Stories'.

The Lectures[edit]

  • December 1927 - 'Andrew Lang', by George Gordon.
  • 1928 - 'Andrew Lang's work for Homer', by Alexander Shewan.
  • 1929 - 'The raw material of religion', by R. R. Marett.
  • 1930 - 'Andrew Lang as historian', by Robert S. Rait.
  • 1931 - 'Andrew Lang and the Maid of France', by Louis Cazamian
  • 1932 - 'Andrew Lang and the Border', by John Buchan (Lord Tweedsmuir).
  • 6 December 1933 - 'Lang, Lockhart and biography', by H.J.C. Grierson.
  • 21 November 1934 - 'Andrew Lang and the House of Stuart', by John Duncan.
  • 1937 - 'Andrew Lang's poetry', by A. Blyth Webster.
  • 8 March 1939 - 'On Fairy-Stories', by J. R. R. Tolkien[1]
  • 7 May 1947 - 'Andrew Lang the poet', by Gilbert Murray.
  • 5 April 1948 - 'Law and custom', by Hugh Pattisan MacMillan, Baron MacMillan.
  • 11 May 1949 - 'Andrew Lang and the casket letter controversy' by J. B. Black.
  • 11 May 1950 - 'Andrew Lang and journalism', by J. B. Salmond
  • 25 April 1951 - 'Andrew Lang : his place in anthropology', by Herbert J. Rose.
  • 14 November 1951 - 'Andrew Lang, John Knox and Scottish Presbyterianism', by William Croft Dickinson.
  • 16 February 1955 - 'Homer and his forerunners', by Maurice Bowra.
  • 14 November 1956 - 'Shakespeare's Scotland', by James Fergusson.
  • 8 February 1978 - 'The writing of Scottish history in the time of Andrew Lang', R.G. Cant.
  • 26 January 1988 - 'The Scottish paradox' by Gordon Wilson
  • 29 April 2004 - 'Hamlet and the Tables of Memory' by Peter Stallybrass [2]
  • 1 November 2012 - 'Folklore versus Fakelore: An Imagined Conversation with Andrew Lang' by Jane Yolen, the first woman to give the Andrew Lang lecture [3] [4]

References[edit]