Andrew Laties

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Andrew Laties is an American writer and bookseller born in Baltimore, Maryland.

Laties has written for a variety of websites[1][2] and magazines[3] He also maintains a personal blog.[4]

In 2005 Vox Pop published his IPPY Award-winning[5] book Rebel Bookseller: How To Improvise Your Own Indie Store And Beat Back The Chains.[6][7][8][9] Vox Pop was an independent publisher and a well-known local café in Brooklyn, New York[10][11][12][13] with which Laties was intimately involved.[14] As of September 8, 2010, however, Vox Pop was forced to close its doors.[15]

A second edition entitled Rebel Bookseller: Why Indie Businesses Represent Everything You Want to Fight for—from Free Speech to Buying Local to Building Communities came out in July 2011 from Seven Stories Press.[16]

In addition to his writing, Laties has spoken on the current state of independent publishing.[17] Most recently he presented a lecture titled "Indie Bookstores Still Count: What We Can Do For Publishers, and What Publishers Can Do For Us" at the Digital Book World 2011 conference.[18]

Laties is the founding manager of the Eric Carle Museum Bookshop[19][20] in Amherst, Massachusetts. Previously, in Chicago, Illinois, Laties co-founded The Children's Bookstore (1985–1996),[21][22][23] which received the 1987 WNBA Pannell Award for Excellence in Children's Bookselling.[24] He then created The Children's Museum Store (1994–2002).[25]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rebel Bookseller: Why Indie Businesses Represent Everything You Want To Fight for, from Free Speech To Buying Local To Building Communities (2011) [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fall of Autumn. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  2. ^ IndieBookMan. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  3. ^ The Horn Book, 05-2011. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  4. ^ Rebel Bookseller. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  5. ^ Independent Publisher, 05-2006. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  6. ^ Bookselling This Week, 08-23-2005. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  7. ^ Publishers Weekly, 05-30-2005. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  8. ^ Richmond Indymedia, 04-27-2006. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  9. ^ The Wall Street Journal, 05-18-2006. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  10. ^ The New York Times, 04-22-2007. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  11. ^ The Village Voice, 03-15-2005. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  12. ^ CNN, 07-09-2009. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  13. ^ CNN, 07-10-2009. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  14. ^ The Village Voice, 05-16-2006. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  15. ^ Brooklyn Ink, 10-07-2010. Retrieved January 5, 2011.
  16. ^ Rebel Bookseller (2011)
  17. ^ Frugal Marketing. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  18. ^ "My Day at Digital Book World", 01-26-2011. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  19. ^ Eric Carle Museum bookshop
  20. ^ Parents Choice. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  21. ^ Chicago Sun-Times, 1-29-1995. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  22. ^ USA Today, 8-27-1990. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  23. ^ INC. Magazine, 10-1-1996. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  24. ^ Women's National Book Association. Retrieved 04-30-2011.
  25. ^ Chicago Tribune, 7-11-1999. Retrieved 04-30-2011.