Andrew Refshauge

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The Honourable Dr.
Andrew Refshauge
13th Deputy Premier of New South Wales
In office
4 April 1995 – 3 August 2005
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Ian Armstrong
Succeeded by John Watkins
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Marrickville
In office
22 October 1983 – 10 August 2005
Preceded by Tom Cahill
Succeeded by Carmel Tebbutt
Minister for Health
In office
4 April 1995 – 8 April 1999
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Ron Phillips
Succeeded by Craig Knowles
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs
In office
4 April 1995 – 3 August 2005
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Jim Longley
Succeeded by Milton Orkopoulos
Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning
In office
8 April 1999 – 21 November 2001
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Craig Knowles
Succeeded by self (as Minister for Planning)
Minister for Housing
In office
8 April 1999 – 2 April 2003
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Craig Knowles
Succeeded by Carl Scully
Minister for Planning
In office
21 November 2001 – 2 April 2003
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by self (as Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning)
Succeeded by Craig Knowles
Minister for Education and Training
In office
2 April 2003 – 21 January 2005
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by John Watkins
Succeeded by Carmel Tebbutt
Minister for State Development
In office
21 January 2005 – 3 August 2005
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Michael Egan
Succeeded by John Watkins
Treasurer
In office
21 January 2005 – 3 August 2005
Premier Bob Carr
Preceded by Michael Egan
Succeeded by Morris Iemma
Personal details
Born (1949-01-16) 16 January 1949 (age 65)
Melbourne, Victoria
Political party Australian Labor Party
Relations Sir William Refshauge AC CBE ED (father)
Parents William Refshauge
and Helen Allwright
Alma mater University of Sydney
Profession Physician and politician
Website NSW Parliament biography

Dr Andrew John Refshauge (born 16 January 1949[1]) is a former Australian politician who was Deputy Premier of New South Wales from 1995 to 2005, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly between 1983 and 2005 representing Labor, and a senior minister in the Carr ministry.

Background and early career[edit]

Refshauge was born in Melbourne, the son of Major General Sir William Refshauge AC CBE ED who later became Honorary Physician to Queen Elizabeth II and Director-General of the Commonwealth Department of Health.[2] He has three brothers and one sister. One brother, Richard Refshauge,[3] is a Judge of the ACT Supreme Court. His sister, Professor Kathryn Refshauge, is the Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney.

Educated at Scotch College, Melbourne, Refshauge studied medicine at the University of Sydney, and after graduating, worked in NSW hospitals and later at the Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern. He helped establish Aboriginal Medical Services in Wilcannia and Kempsey. In 1973 Refshauge and others founded the Doctors Reform Society of Australia, a left-leaning group advocating for health care improvements.

Political career[edit]

Angered by the dismissal of the Whitlam Government, Refshauge joined the Australian Labor Party.[citation needed] In 1983 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the member for Marrickville on the same day that Bob Carr was elected the member for Maroubra in by-elections. He served in a variety of portfolios, as well as rising to be the leader of the left faction of the party, Deputy Leader of the Opposition in 1988, and Deputy Premier in 1995 following the election of the Carr government.[4]

Refshauge was the Legislative Assembly representative on the Senate of the University of Sydney between 1987 and 1988 and was the Deputy Leader of the Opposition between 11 April 1988 and 4 April 1995. Prior to entering politics he was a member of the Aboriginal Affairs Policy Committee (1981–1986). Refshauge was a delegate to Labor's State Conference (1984–2005); an executive committee member of the H.V. Evatt Memorial Foundation; a board member of the Mandela Foundation; and a Fellow of the Senate of the University of Sydney (1983–1986).[1]

During his term in parliament, Refshauge served as minister between 1995 and 2005 in portfolios covering Health, Aboriginal Affairs, Urban Affairs and Planning, Housing, Education and Training, State Development and as Treasurer.

Refshauge announced his resignation from Parliament, as Deputy Premier and from the ministry in August 2005, a few days after Bob Carr announced his retirement as Premier and from Parliament. Refshauge originally had planned to retire at the 2007 election but was prompted to go earlier with Carr's retirement and a request by the replacement premier, Morris Iemma that Refshauge stand aside to allow for a new Deputy Premier so that there could be a new leadership team.[5]

"Bob and I got in [to Parliament] on the same day. Maybe our replacement should come in on the same day too. I've decided that the time is right to move on to other things. But the time is right, I have decided it's right to leave."

— Andrew Refshauge, announcing his retirement from politics, 2 August 2005.[4]

Career after politics[edit]

Refshauge presently holds a number of senior community leadership roles, including the Chair of CareFlight (NSW), since 2007 to the present; a director of Family Care Medical Services, since 2007; a director of the Aged Care Standards Accreditation Agency, since 2008 and Chair since 1 July 2012;[6] and the Chair of the Investment Committee of the Aboriginal Land Council of New South Wales, since 2008.

He has previously served in a range of other community roles, including the Chair of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; a director of the Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, later to become Neuroscience Research Australia; a member of the Foundation for Research and Treatment of Alcoholism and Drug Dependence; and a director of the Family Care Medical Services.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Hon. Dr Andrew John REFSHAUGE (1949 - )". Former Members Index A-Z. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Farquharson, John. "Refshauge, Sir William Dudley (1913–2009)". Obituaries Australia. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 
  3. ^ "Refshauge: William Richard: National Medal". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. 16 October 2007. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Refshauge resigns from NSW politics". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2 August 2005. Retrieved 19 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Nolan, Tanya (2 August 2005). "Andrew Refshauge quits NSW politics". PM (Australia: ABC Radio). Retrieved 19 March 2014. 
  6. ^ Butler, Mark; Minister for Mental Health and Ageing (7 June 2012). "Dr Andrew Refshauge appointed new chair of Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency". Aged Care Crisis (Press release). Retrieved 19 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "Board of Directors". Aged Care Standards Accreditation Agency. Retrieved 19 March 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Tom Cahill
Member for Marrickville
1983 – 2005
Succeeded by
Carmel Tebbutt
Political offices
Preceded by
Ian Armstrong
Deputy Premier of New South Wales
1995 – 2005
Succeeded by
John Watkins
Preceded by
Ron Phillips
Minister for Health
1995 – 1999
Succeeded by
Craig Knowles
Preceded by
Jim Longley
Minister Aboriginal Affairs
1995 – 2005
Succeeded by
Milton Orkopoulos
Preceded by
Craig Knowles
Minister for Urban Affairs and Planning
1999 – 2001
Succeeded by
Craig Knowles
Minister for Planning
2001 – 2003
Preceded by
Craig Knowles
Minister for Housing
1999 – 2003
Succeeded by
Carl Scully
Preceded by
John Watkins
Minister for Education and Training
2003 – 2005
Succeeded by
Carmel Tebbutt
Preceded by
Michael Egan
Minister for State Development
2005
Succeeded by
John Watkins
Preceded by
Michael Egan
Treasurer
2005
Succeeded by
Morris Iemma