Andrew Sluyter

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Andrew Sluyter
Born 1958[1]
Fields Geography
Alma mater
Doctoral advisor William E. Doolittle

Andrew Sluyter is an American social scientist who currently teaches as an Associate Professor in the Geography and Anthropology Department of the Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. His interests are the environmental history and historical, cultural, and political ecology of the colonization of the Americas.[2] He has made various contributions to the theorization of colonialism and landscape, the critique of neo-environmental determinism, to understanding pre-colonial and colonial agriculture and environmental change in Mexico, and to revealing African contributions to establishing cattle ranching in the Americas. With the publication of Black Ranching Frontiers: African Cattle Herders of the Atlantic World, 1500–1900 (Yale University Press, 2012) and a 2012-13 Digital Innovation Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, he has joined a growing number of scholars from multiple disciplines working from the perspective of Atlantic History and using the tools of the Digital Humanities.[3]

Background[edit]

Sluyter received his PhD-degree in 1995 from the Department of Geography and the Environment at University of Texas at Austin.[4] In 2004, he earned the James M. Blaut Award in Recognition of Innovative Scholarship from the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers.[5] From 2005 to 2008, Sluyter was a member of the Board of Directors of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers. From 2007 through 2012, he was Associate Editor of the Geographical Review.[6] And since 2006 he has served on the United States Geography Commission of the Pan-American Institute of Geography and History of the Organization of American States.[7]

Students[edit]

Geographers who have studied with him include Amy E. Potter (PhD 2011), now a faculty member at Armstrong Atlantic State University, and Richard Hunter (PhD 2009), now a member of the geography faculty of the State University of New York at Cortland.

Publications (selection)[edit]

Books[edit]

Journal Articles[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]