Andrew Stoner

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The Honourable
Andrew Stoner
MP
Andrew Stoner.jpg
16th Deputy Premier of New South Wales
Incumbent
Assumed office
28 March 2011
Premier Barry O'Farrell
Mike Baird
Preceded by Carmel Tebbutt
Constituency Oxley
Leader of the New South Wales National Party
Incumbent
Assumed office
31 March 2003
Deputy Don Page (2003–2007)
Andrew Fraser (2007–2008)
Adrian Piccoli (2008–)
Preceded by George Souris
Minister for Trade and Investment
Incumbent
Assumed office
3 April 2011
Premier Barry O'Farrell; Mike Baird
Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services
Incumbent
Assumed office
3 April 2011
Premier Barry O'Farrell; Mike Baird
Preceded by Eric Roozendaal (as Minister for State and Regional Development)
Minister for Tourism and Major Events
Incumbent
Assumed office
23 April 2014
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by George Souris
Minister for Small Business
Incumbent
Assumed office
23 April 2014
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by Katrina Hodgkinson
Minister for the North Coast
Incumbent
Assumed office
23 April 2014
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by Don Page
Personal details
Born Andrew John Stoner
(1960-01-14) 14 January 1960 (age 54)
Brisbane, Queensland
Nationality Australian
Political party National Party of Australia
Spouse(s) Cathy Stoner
Children Steve, Beau, Gemma, and Abbie plus one other
Occupation Politician
Religion Christianity[1]
Website andrewstoner.com.au
[2][3][4]

Andrew John Stoner (born 14 January 1960), an Australian politician, is the New South Wales Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment, and Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services, since March 2011; and the Minister for Tourism and Major Events, the Minister for Small Business, and the Minister for the North Coast, since April 2014 in the Baird government.[5] Stoner is the Leader of the New South Wales National Party since 31 March 2003. He was elected as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing Oxley at the 1999 state election.[2]

Biography[edit]

Stoner was born in 1960 in Brisbane, Queensland, before his family moved to Grafton, New South Wales. He attended the Queensland Institute of Technology from 1979 to 1985, receiving a Bachelor of Business, and later James Cook University of North Queensland in 1993, receiving a Master of Business Administration with first class honours. He became an employment agency manager and a regional manager in the Australian Public Service before entering parliament.[6]

Stoner joined the National Party of Australia and was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly on 27 March 1999 for Oxley. He was appointed the National Party Deputy Whip in his first term in office and rose to become Shadow Minister for Emergency Services and Shadow Minister for Sport and Recreation from 2002 to 2003. However, after the Liberal-National Coalition lost the 2003 election, the then Nationals leader George Souris stood aside and Stoner was elected in his place.[7]

Stoner helped lead the Coalition to a landslide victory in the 2011 state election. The Liberals won a majority in their own right for the first time ever (51 seats). Although O'Farrell could have theoretically governed alone, he chose to retain the coalition with the Nationals. In a 2013 interview marking his ten–year anniversary as leader of the Nationals, Stoner reflected that:[8]

(Mr O’Farrell) could see that The Nationals supported him, that we weren’t a disunifying force within the Coalition and as a result we had a strong Coalition and he and I had a strong personal relationship. Barry is a very good student of political history and he knows the 2011 election result was probably a high water mark for the Liberal party (and) that The Nationals tend to be a little more stable in terms of their own numbers between elections. When the tide goes back out for the Liberal party, he will need The Nationals. It will happen and he will need, at some stage, the National party.

— Andrew Stoner, interviewed by The Land, April 2013.

Owing to the resignation of Barry O'Farrell as Premier,[9] and the subsequent ministerial reshuffle by Mike Baird, the new Liberal Leader,[5] in April 2014 in addition to his existing responsibilities as a minister, Stoner was appointed as the Minister for Tourism and Major Events, as the Minister for Small Business, and as the Minister for the North Coast.[2][10]

Personal life[edit]

A keen surfer[citation needed] and father of six, Stoner resides with his wife Cathy in the neighbouring electorate of Port Macquarie on the Mid North Coast. Stoner is a Christian and attends the charismatic C3 Church.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Patty, Anna (6 April 2012). "MPs moved by heaven and earth". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "The Hon. Andrew John Stoner, BBus, MBA MP". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. 30 September 2011. Retrieved 28 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Inaugural Speech: Mr Andrew Stoner". Hansard: Legislative Assembly. Parliament of New South Wales. 2 June 1999. Retrieved 28 December 2011. 
  4. ^ Rehn, Alison (12 August 2008). "Andrew Stoner, Alexander Downer & Julia Gillard in Facebook folly". The Daily Telegraph. Australia. Retrieved 26 April 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Nicholls, Sean (22 April 2014). "Mike Baird's cabinet reshuffle a preparation for next election". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "Andrew Stoner". National Party of Australia. Retrieved 2007-02-25. [dead link]
  7. ^ http://www.nsw.nationals.org.au/
  8. ^ Luke, Julian (11 April 2013). "Stoner marks 10 years at the top". The Land. Retrieved 26 April 2014. 
  9. ^ "Barry O'Farrell quits as NSW Premier over memory fail". The Australian. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  10. ^ "Mike Baird's NSW cabinet". The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 April 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Bruce Jeffery
Member for Oxley
1999–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
George Souris
Leader of the New South Wales National Party
2003–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Carmel Tebbutt
Deputy Premier of New South Wales
2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
new portfolio
Minister for Trade and Investment
2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Eric Roozendaal
as Minister for State and Regional Development
Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services
2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
George Souris
Minister for Tourism and Major Events
2014–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Katrina Hodgkinson
Minister for Small Business
2014–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Don Page
Minister for the North Coast
2014–present
Incumbent