Andrew W. Hockenhull

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Andrew W. Hockenhull
Andrew Hockenhull.jpg
10th Governor of New Mexico
In office
September 25, 1933 – January 1, 1935
Preceded by Arthur Seligman
Succeeded by Clyde Tingley
8th Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico
In office
January 1, 1931 – September 25, 1933
Governor Arthur Seligman
Preceded by Hugh B. Woodward
Succeeded by Louis Cabeza de Baca
Personal details
Born (1877-01-16)January 16, 1877
near Bolivar, Missouri
Died June 20, 1974(1974-06-20) (aged 97)
Clovis, New Mexico
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mamie Drake
Residence Clovis
Profession Attorney
Religion Baptist Church

Andrew W. Hockenhull (January 16, 1877 – June 20, 1974) was the tenth Governor of New Mexico.

Background[edit]

Hockenhull was born in rural Missouri, near Bolivar. He attended Southwest Baptist College in Bolivar, received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Missouri in 1897, and studied law at the University of Texas at Austin.[1] Hockenhull married Maine Drake at Bolivar, Mo. on November 20, 1901. They had three daughters, Gertrude, Virginia, and Helen.

Hockenhull moved to New Mexico Territory in 1908 and homesteaded near Tucumcari, in Quay County. In 1909 he moved to Clovis and began practicing law there in 1909. He also served as assistant district attorney (1912–1916), and city attorney for six years. During the Great War (World War I) he served as a member of the Lawyers Committee and the Council of Defense. A lawyer and banker, he had extensive agricultural interests throughout Curry County.[2] A Democrat, Hockenhull was elected Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico in 1930 and was re-elected in 1932.[3] He became governor upon the death of Governor Arthur Seligman in September, 1933, and completed the term [4] on December 31, 1934.[5]

Contending with the Depression consumed most of his term.[6] After leaving office, Hockenhull returned to his legal career. In 1939, he was appointed postmaster of Clovis, starting May 31, 1939.[7]

Titles[edit]

He is the second Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico to assume the governor's office due to the death of the sitting governor. He also holds the title of the longest surviving former-governor of New Mexico, living 97 years, and 40 years beyond the expiration of his term.

References[edit]

  1. ^ State of New Mexico (July 2012). Kathryn A. Flynn, ed. 2012 Centennial Blue Book. Diana J. Duran. Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State. pp. 218–219. 
  2. ^ http://www.newmexicohistory.org/filedetails.php?fileID=1259/ New Mexico Office of the State Historian
  3. ^ State of New Mexico (July 2012). Kathryn A. Flynn, ed. 2012 Centennial Blue Book. Diana J. Duran. Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State. pp. 218–219. 
  4. ^ State of New Mexico (July 2012). Kathryn A. Flynn, ed. 2012 Centennial Blue Book. Diana J. Duran. Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State. p. 211. 
  5. ^ http://www.newmexicohistory.org/filedetails.php?fileID=1259/ New Mexico Office of the State Historian
  6. ^ http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_new_mexico/col2-content/main-content-list/title_hockenhull_andrew.html/ National Governors Association biography
  7. ^ http://www.newmexicohistory.org/filedetails.php?fileID=1259/ New Mexico Office of the State Historian
Political offices
Preceded by
Arthur Seligman
Governor of New Mexico
1933-1935
Succeeded by
Clyde Tingley