Andrew Zuckerman

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Andrew Zuckerman (born 1977) is an American filmmaker and photographer. He is best known for creating hyper-real images set against stark white backgrounds. His subjects have included birds, endangered species of animals, politicians, humanitarians, artists, and entertainers.[1]

Zuckerman received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in 1999. He began his career as a commercial still life photographer,[2] before releasing the book, Creature, a portrait series of animals, in 2007. He has since published four additional volumes: Wisdom'' (2008), Bird (2009), Music (2010), and Flower (2012). Wisdom and Music were also realized as feature length, interview-format documentary films.[3][4] In 2006, Zuckerman co-founded the company, Late Night and Weekends, through which he released the acclaimed documentary, Still Bill, about the life of Blues musician, Bill Withers,[5] and created campaigns for brands including Puma and Gap.[6][7] He produced and directed his first short narrative film, High Falls, starring Maggie Gyllenhaal and Peter Sarsgaard, in 2007. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and received the award for best short narrative at the Woodstock Film Festival the same year.[8][9] Writing for The New York Times, David Carr called the project "a pretty film, and a pretty smart film."[10] His recent brand work includes an ongoing collaboration with Apple, producing and directing product launch videos. Despite widespread Internet speculation that Sam Mendes directed the iPhone 4's FaceTime camapaign, it was actually Zuckerman who was responsible for the ads.[11][12]

Works and Technique[edit]

Zuckerman has spoken extensively about his interest in systematically collecting and organizing data to create multiple entry points into work that is conceptual in nature.[13] One such system is a comprehensive mobile studio, consisting of fourteen cases of equipment,[14] with which Zuckerman has traveled the world in order to situate all of his subjects in the same space.[13] In addition to photographers including Richard Avedon and Irving Penn, he cites designers like Massimo and Lella Vignelli and Buckminster Fuller as influences,[15] and has said that his minimalist style is “a function of what I was after conceptually with the work I was creating [and] a solution to a series of desires I have for what I want my work to communicate” rather than an aesthetic choice.[16] He has discussed his use of white as a transportational device that allows him to draw out the essential nature of his subjects.[13][16]

Zuckerman began exploring his signature approach in Creature. By dispensing with the environmental framework of conventional nature photography, the images focus on the form and character of a specific animal in a specific space, rather than its behavior in a habitat or evolutionary purpose.[17] Zuckerman has said that he drew inspiration from the dioramas at the Museum of Natural History[18] and was interested in creating a kind of two-dimensional taxidermy.[19] The book includes a taxonimical index for each of the species photographed.

Zuckerman applied the same visual language – intimate, close-up portraits against a bright white background – to the Wisdom project, for which he filmed, photographed, and interviewed 60 politicians, artists, entertainers, designers and religious and business leaders over the age of 65, including Chuck Close, Frank Gehry, Judi Dench, Clint Eastwood, Jane Goodall, Desmond Tutu, and Ted Kennedy.[20][21]

During the making of Wisdom, Zuckerman became interested in the idea of the dynamic portrait, one that incorporates voice, physical presence, and written word.[22] Interviewing subjects around the common themes of love, work, conflict resolution, and the environment, and utilizing a mobile studio,[23] Zuckerman aimed to place his contributors in the same virtual space and conversation, creating what he refers to as a “group of global elders to speak to our global village”.[24] The Wisdom traveling exhibit, which premiered at The Library of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, incorporates text, video, and images from the project, and continues to tour internationally today.[25]

Following the release of Wisdom, Zuckerman began work on Bird. His hyper-detailed photographs of over seventy species nod at John James Audubon’s ornithological drawings.[19] In order to capture physical qualities and flight activity rarely visible to the viewer, Zuckerman instituted a variety of techniques, including a custom-built delay system, in which the bird’s movement triggered the exposure[19]]. In 2012, his image of the Blue Fronted Amazon in flight was included in Florian Heine's Photography: The Groundbreaking Moments. Of Zuckerman's imagery, Heine lauded "the variety and the brilliant colors [which] have never been shown in this way before."[26] The Bird website features a short accompanying film, and incorporates additional data such as wingspan and audio files of each species’ call. Both Creature and Bird are informed by a conservationist element, and include portraits of many rare or endangered animals.[16]

Music, was released as a book, film, and iPad application in 2010, and features portraits of and interviews with musicians from disparate genres, including Lenny Kravitz, Ozzy Osbourne, Herbie Hancock, and Philip Glass. Following the footprint he laid out in Wisdom, Zuckerman touched upon similar themes in interviews with each of his contributors, and the documentary intersects footage of the artists as they discuss performance, collaboration, inspiration, and success.[27]

Returning to his visual survey of the natural world with his 2012 project, Flower, Zuckerman photographed over 230 varieties of flora, drawing inspiration from 19th century botanical drawings. He has expressed his desire to create, with the use of modern technology, "the best possible two-dimensional representation of three-dimensional living things",[28] and to separate his subject from its metaphorical associations in art.[29] Like Creature and Bird, Flower includes a taxonomical index. The project, which filmmaker David Lynch has called "a grand celebration of mother nature's artistry" ,[30] also incorporates time lapse films of the life cycles of seven different species. The films were created from high definition stills, as opposed to video footage.[28]

Zuckerman has expressed his interest in exploring singular subjects from a multitude of perspectives and engaging his audience across a variety of platforms.[13][27] In addition to books, film, and the internet, his approach incorporates making-of and behind-the-scenes footage, which is accessible on each of the microsites that accompany his major projects. Though he’s received criticism for exposing his technique, he has said he’s concerned with lifting the veil on the artistic process, and exposing solutions to creative problems.[13][15]

Books[edit]

  • Creature (2007)
  • Wisdom (2008)
  • Bird (2009)
  • Music (2010)
  • "Flower" (2012)

Films[edit]

  • High Falls (2007), Director, Producer
  • Wisdom (2008), Director, Producer, Executive Producer
  • "Bird" (2009), Director, Producer
  • Still BIll (2009), Executive Producer
  • Music (2010), Director, Producer, Executive Producer
  • "Flower" (2012), Director, Producer

Solo exhibitions[edit]

2007 Creature, Forma International Center of Photography, Milan, Italy

2008 Wisdom, State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

2009 Bird Film, High Line, New York City, NY Bird, Colette, Paris, France

2010 Bird Film, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA Bird Film, International Film Festival Breda, Breda, The Netherlands Wisdom Exhibit, World Financial Center, Winter Garden, New York City, NY Wisdom Exhibit, Siamsa Tire Gallery, Dingle, Ireland

2011 Wisdom, Bank of America Plaza, Los Angeles, CA Wisdom, Brookfield Place Adam Lambert Galleria, Toronto, CA Wisdom, Bay Adelaide Center, Toronto, CA

Selected Group Exhibitions[edit]

1999 SVA mentor show

2003 Young Guns Show

2007 SUNY ULSTER Muroff Kotler Gallery, Stone Ridge New York, USA

2008 Paris Photo, Carrousel du Louvre, Paris, France

2011 Obstacle, Invisible Dog Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Getxphoto Festival, Bilbao, Spain

2013 Flowers and Mushrooms Museum der Moderne, Salzburg, Austria

Honors/Awards[edit]

2003 Art Directors Club, Young Guns

2005 Broadcast Design Award

2006 D&AD Yellow Pencil For Photography

2007 High Falls, Woodstock Film Festival, Best Short Film High Falls, Sundance Film Festival, Official Selection"

Annuals[edit]

2003 American Photography Annual Communication Arts Annual

2005 Communication Arts Photography Annual PDN Photography Annual PDN 30

2006 Communication Arts Annual PDN Photography Annual

2007 PDN Digital_Personal PDN Digital_Music Graphis Advertising Annual Graphis Photography Annual PDN Photography Annual

2008 Communication Arts Annual PDN Photo Annual Graphis Photography Annual

2009 American Photography 25 Communication Arts Annual

2010 Graphis Photography Annual American Photography 26 PDN Photo Annual Communication Arts D&AD Annual

2011 Graphis Photography Annual, 100 Best in Photography

External references[edit]

[31][32][33][34][35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Andrew Zuckerman Website". 
  2. ^ DeFoore, Jay. "Andrew Zuckerman's Creature". Pop Photo. Retrieved 19 September 2007. 
  3. ^ "Wisdom IMDB". IMDB. 
  4. ^ "Music IMDB". IMDB. 
  5. ^ Hale, Mike (27 January 2010). "A Singer Who Stopped Showing Off". New York Times. Retrieved 27 June 2010. 
  6. ^ "Gap Born to Fit". Videography. Retrieved 24 September 2009. 
  7. ^ Ozler, Levent. "Suspect and Late Night and Weekends Dance a Jig for Puma". Dexigner. Retrieved 16 April 2008. 
  8. ^ "High Falls IMDB". IMDB. 
  9. ^ Seller, Casey. "Woodstock Winners". Times Union. Retrieved 15 October 2007. 
  10. ^ "Taking the Short Leap from 'High Falls'". New York Times. 31 January 2007. Retrieved 31 January 2007. 
  11. ^ Siegler, MG. "It's as if Apple Has Hired Don Draper". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 12 July 2010. Retrieved 10 July 2010. 
  12. ^ "iPhone 4 is Finally Out. Ad directed by Andrew Zuckerman". Style Frizz. 
  13. ^ a b c d e "Creative Mornings Talk". Swiss Miss. Archived from the original on 11 February 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011. 
  14. ^ Day, Karen. "The 99% Conference 2011: Day Two Recap". Coolhunting. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  15. ^ a b Blackwell, Lewis (2009) Photo Wisdom Chronicle, p. 24, ISBN 978-0-473-15094-5.
  16. ^ a b c "Andrew Zuckerman: Graphic Portraiture". Photography Monthly. 2011-01-04. 
  17. ^ "Creature by Andrew Zuckerman". London: The Telegraph. 20 March 2009. 
  18. ^ "The Animal Kingdom in Ultra Hi-Res". Wired. 2007-10-23. 
  19. ^ a b c "Creature Comforts". Audubon. July–August 2008. 
  20. ^ Pressman, Matt. "Learning from the Best". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 17 November 2008. 
  21. ^ Zuckerman, Andrew (27 September 2008). "Wisdom from Famous over-65s". London: The Sunday Times. Retrieved 27 September 2008. 
  22. ^ "BBC World Service Newshour". BBC. Retrieved 5 May 2011. 
  23. ^ Gutoff, Bija. "Andrew Zuckerman: The Wisdom Project". Apple. 
  24. ^ "Andrew Zuckerman Gallery Talk". Library of New South Wales. 
  25. ^ ""Wisdom" Photo Exhibit". Pitch Engine. Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  26. ^ Heine, Florian (20012) "Photography: The Groundbreaking Moments" Prestel, p. 143, ISBN 3791346695.
  27. ^ a b "Last_Call_with_Carson_Daly/video/andrew-zuckerman/1264398/". NBC.com. 
  28. ^ a b Tinsley, Claire. "Flower Power, Redefined". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
  29. ^ Garced, Kristi. "Waris Ahluwalia, Peter Sarsgaard Fete Andrew Zuckerman's Flower". WWD. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
  30. ^ Lynch, David. "Lynch on Flower". Andrew Zuckerman Studio. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  31. ^ Marcus, Leonard S. (6 December 2009). "Animal Spirits". New York TImes. Retrieved 4 December 2009. 
  32. ^ "What is Wisdom". BBC World Service. Retrieved 2 January 2009. 
  33. ^ Carter, Nicole (25 January 2009). "'Wisdom' of the Ages". New York Daily News. 
  34. ^ Vignelli, Massimo (10 June 2011). "Beauty Contest". 
  35. ^ "Swooping the Colour". The Sunday Times Magazine, SPECTRUM. 24 June 2010. 


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