Andrews, Texas

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Andrews, Texas
City
Water tower in Andrews, Texas
Water tower in Andrews, Texas
Motto: "Move Ahead"
Location of Andrews, Texas
Location of Andrews, Texas
Coordinates: 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167Coordinates: 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167
Country United States
State Texas
County Andrews
GovernmentCouncil-Manager
 • Type Mayor and Council serve as volunteers and appoint a city manager.
 • City Manager Glen Hackler
 • Mayor Flora Braly
Area
 • Total 4.9 sq mi (12.7 km2)
 • Land 4.9 sq mi (12.7 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 3,176 ft (968 m)
Population (2013)
 • Total 16,117
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 79714
Area code(s) 432
FIPS code 48-03216[1]
GNIS feature ID 1329539[2]
Website www.cityofandrews.org
Downtown Andrews
A rural scene on U.S. Route 385 north of Andrews

Andrews is a city in and the county seat of Andrews County in the U.S. state of Texas within the West Texas region.[3] The population was 16,117 as of 2013.[4] Along with Midland and Odessa, these cities form the Midland-Odessa Combined Statistical Area with a population of 274,002 in four counties.[5] Andrews was the fastest growing Texas micropolitan in 2008 and 2009.[6]

Andrews was incorporated on February 2, 1937. Both the city and county were named for Richard Andrews, the first Texan soldier to die in the Texas Revolution.

Geography[edit]

Andrews is located at 32°19′17″N 102°33′6″W / 32.32139°N 102.55167°W / 32.32139; -102.55167 (32.321401, -102.551733).[7]

United States Highway 385 (north-south), Texas State Highway 115 (east-west), and Texas State Highway 176 (east-west) intersect through Andrews.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1940 611
1950 3,294 439.1%
1960 11,135 238.0%
1970 8,625 −22.5%
1980 11,061 28.2%
1990 10,678 −3.5%
2000 9,652 −9.6%
2010 11,088 14.9%
U.S. Census Bureau[8]

As of the census[1] of 2010, there were 11,088 people, and 4,379 households residing in the city. The population density was 2,310 people per square mile (891.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 78.9% White, 1.86% African American, 0.95% Native American, 0.68% Asian, <0.01% Pacific Islander, 15.5% from other races, and 2.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 50.2% of the population.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 7.01% from 18 to 24, 13.9% from 25 to 34, 18.9% from 35 to 49, 16.5% from 50 to 64, and 11.4% were 65 years of age or older. Males accounted for 50.2% and females 49.8% of the population.

In 2009 the estimated median income for a household in the city was $45,526, and the median income for a family was $51,271. The per capita income for the city was $21,016. About 14.13% of families were below the poverty line.

Andrews is the only city in Andrews County.

Economic development[edit]

Andrews is a city built on oil and soil. After the first oil well was drilled (1929) by Deep Rock Oil Company on Missourian Charles E. Ogden's property Andrews County became one of the major oil producing counties in the State of Texas, having produced in excess of 1 billion barrels (160,000,000 m3) of oil. However, the cyclical nature of the oil business (as well as diminishing production on existing wells), has caused the community to look into new means of economic development, such as waste disposal, which in some areas has caused controversy.

Waste Control Specialists (WCS), owned by Harold Simmons and headquartered in Dallas, Texas, operates a 14,000 acres (57 km2) site in Andrews County on the border with New Mexico. The company was awarded a license to dispose of radioactive waste by the TCEQ in 2009. The permit allows for disposal of radioactive materials such as uranium, plutonium and thorium from commercial power plants, academic institutions and medical schools.[9] The company finished construction on the project in 2011 and started disposing of waste in 2012. There are two radioactive waste landfills at the site. The 30-acre compact site is owned and regulated by the State of Texas for use by Texas, Vermont, and up to 36 other states. The 90-acre federal site is owned by the United States federal government and is used for Department of Energy and other federal waste.[10] The company employs 130 people or about 1% of the total labor force in Andrews.[11]

The city was set to be the location of the now defunct $400 million HT3R project.

In 1972, Andrews became the site of the first Kirby Company vacuum cleaner factory outside of the original location in Ohio. It is often referred to as "Kirby West" to signify the westward expansion of the country. The company employs about 200 people.

In 2011 the city opened Business Park South to provide more incentive options for attracting businesses. Energy Business Park was also opened by the city in 2014.[12]

The city completed more than $3 million in airport renovations. Voters approved bonds to construct a new $13 million loop around town which opened in October 2013.[13] A brand new $2 million fire station opened at the end of 2013. A new $60 million hospital is also planned to open in 2015.[14]

The town began to sell alcohol for the first time on December 19, 2013.

Education[edit]

Students are served by the Andrews Independent School District. The school opened two new $18.5 million elementary school campuses and a $20 million performance center at the high school in 2008.

The high school started issuing laptop computers to each student in 2012. The elementary and middle school campuses also began to issue iPad tablets to all students. Students are allowed to take the devices home, but must return them at the end of the school year.[15]

Due to increased enrollments several construction projects began construction in 2013. New classrooms were added to all school campuses.[16]

Junior College[edit]

The Andrews Business and Technology Center was completed in January 2006, in conjunction with Odessa College and the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. The school focuses on technology and is a hub for distance learning. A $1 million expansion of the campus was completed in 2013 adding space for a Registered Nurse (RN) program.

Parks and recreation[edit]

Andrews County Veterans Memorial[edit]

The Andrews County Veterans Memorial is a memorial in Andrews which was created in 2006 as a tribute to those Andrews County residents who served in the United States' armed forces. Soldiers from every major conflict in which America has participated are honored.[17]

Andrews Bird Viewing Trail[edit]

The Andrews Bird Viewing Trail opened to the public in 2007. The park includes a .2 mile trail alongside ponds with an overlook deck, benches, and an observation binocular stand.

ACE Arena[edit]

In effort to attract events to the community, the city funded and built ACE Arena (a multi-purpose arena) which opened in March 2007. A smaller outdoor arena was also constructed in 2012 adjacent to the indoor arena.

Andrews City Pool[edit]

The city approved a $2 million water park to replace the former city pool in 2013.[18]

Museum Of Andrews[edit]

The city started construction on a new museum in 2013 inside the first home built in Andrews. The house was relocated to property adjacent to the Andrews County Veterans Memorial.

Post Office[edit]

The Andrews Post Office is located at 100 NW Avenue H, Andrews, Texas 79714-9998.

Notable people[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

  • The Bachelor filmed episode 705 in Andrews in 2005.
  • Black Gold was filmed in Andrews for the 1st season.
  • Parts of Gasland were filmed in Andrews.

Climate[edit]

According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Andrews has a semi-arid climate, abbreviated "BSk" on climate maps.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ . CNN http://money.cnn.com/gallery/pf/2013/03/19/oil-boomtowns/3.html. Retrieved October 16, 2013.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Midland-Odessa, TX CSA". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 9, 2013. 
  6. ^ http://www.texasahead.org/texasrising/tr1006/back.html
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ "Selected Historical Decennial Census Population and Housing Counts". Historical Decennial Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 3 July 2011. Retrieved 11 August 2011. 
  9. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/texas-site-begins-taking-federal-nuclear-waste-19343196#.UblWMfk3vg0
  10. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/texas-site-begins-taking-federal-nuclear-waste-19343196#.UblWMfk3vg0
  11. ^ http://www.andrewsedc.com/profiles.pdf
  12. ^ http://andrewsedc.com/energypark.php
  13. ^ http://www.newswest9.com/story/23640482/reliever-route-finally-opens-in-andrews2
  14. ^ http://permianbasin360.com/fulltext?nxd_id=260212
  15. ^ http://wwww.cbs7kosa.com/news/details.asp?ID=37786
  16. ^ http://www.cbs7kosa.com/news/details.asp?ID=53004
  17. ^ Andrews County Veterans Memorial http://www.andrewscountyveteransmemorial.com/index.htm Accessed 1-13-2008
  18. ^ http://www.newswest9.com/story/22848250/splashparks-approved-for-andrews
  19. ^ "Chad Campbell". PGA Tour. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  20. ^ http://maxlucado.com/press/
  21. ^ "Shaud Rashae Williams". Pro-Football-Reference.Com. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  22. ^ Climate Summary for Andrews, Texas

External links[edit]