Anemone Geyser

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Anemone Geyser
Anemone Geyser.jpg
Anemone Geyser
Name origin Hague Party, 1904
Location Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Teton County, Wyoming
Coordinates 44°27′46″N 110°49′44″W / 44.4627392°N 110.828978°W / 44.4627392; -110.828978Coordinates: 44°27′46″N 110°49′44″W / 44.4627392°N 110.828978°W / 44.4627392; -110.828978[1]
Type Fountain geyser
Eruption height 6 feet (1.8 m) - 8 feet (2.4 m) (Big Anemone)
4 feet (1.2 m) (Little Anemone)
Frequency 6–10 minutes (Big Anemone)
6–35 minutes (Little Anemone)
Duration 25–45 seconds (Big Anemone)
1–30 minutes (Little Anemone)
Temperature 193 °F (89 °C) [1]

Anemone Geyser is a geyser in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park in the United States. Anemone is actually two closely related geysers. The larger of the two is known as Big or North Anemone while the smaller is known as Little or South Anemone.[2] The two geysers were named after the anemone flower by the Hague Party in 1904.[3] Both vents have a pale yellow color and shape similar to the flower.

Geology[edit]

Big Anemone has eruptions lasting 25 to 45 seconds every 6 to 10 minutes reaching a height of 6 to 8 feet (1.8 to 2.4 m). Water can be heard rising in the crater prior to eruption. After an eruption, the water quickly and noisily retreats into the crater.[4]

Little Anemone has less vigorous but longer lasting eruptions than Big Anemone. Interval between eruptions can vary from 6 to 35 minutes, and eruptions can last from less than a minute to more than 30 minutes. The fountain rarely reaches more than 4 feet (1.2 m) in height and on occasion, the crater will fill with water then drain without erupting.

On occasion, Little Anemone has near non-stop activity. This causes Big Anemone to have very long intervals and weak eruptions. The Anemone geysers are also part of the weekly Geyser Hill wave, it increases and decreases their interval and duration over the course of a week or multiples of one week.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Anemone Geyser". Yellowstone Geothermal Features Database. Montana State University. 
  2. ^ Taylor, Ralph. "Gazing at Yellowstone’s Geysers". Yellowstone Science. Retrieved 2009-11-20. 
  3. ^ Bauer, Clyde Max (1947). Yellowstone Geysers. Yellowstone Park, Wyoming: Haynes. ASIN B0007E44C4. 
  4. ^ "Big Anemone Geyser". Geyser Observation and Study Association (GOSA). Retrieved 2009-11-20. 

External links[edit]