Anemone canadensis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Meadow Anemone" redirects here. For the other plant by the same name, see Pasque flower.
Anemone canadensis
Anemone canadensis.jpg
Conservation status
Endangered in some areas
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Anemone
Species: A. canadensis
Binomial name
Anemone canadensis
L.

Anemone canadensis (Canada anemone, round-headed anemone, meadow anemone, crowfoot)[1] is a herbaceous perennial native to moist meadows, thickets, streambanks, and lakeshores in North America, spreading rapidly by underground rhizomes, valued for its white flowers.

Description[edit]

Shoots with deeply divided and toothed basal leaves grow from caudices on long, thin rhizomes.

Flowers with about 5 sepals and numerous stamens bloom from late spring to summer on stems above a cluster of leaves.

Seeds are achenes, borne in a small dense head.

Uses[edit]

In former times it was used medically by North American Indigenous peoples as an astringent and as a styptic for wounds, sores, nosebleeds, and as an eyewash. The root was respected by Plains tribes and used for many ailments.

Toxicity[edit]

It is likely that most Anemones contain the caustic irritants of the Ranunculaceae family. [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nathaniel Lord Britton, Addison Brown (1913). An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions: From Newfoundland to the Parallel of the Southern Boundary of Virginia, and from the Atlantic Ocean Westward to the 102d Meridian 2. C. Scribner's sons.  page 99
  2. ^ Foster, Steven and James A. Duke. Eastern/Central Medicinal Plants, "Peterson Field Guides", Houghton, Mifflin 1990 edn. ISBN 0-395-92066-3

External links[edit]