Anemone hupehensis

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Anemone hupehensis
Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 1.jpg
Japanese anemones have yellow stamens and white petals.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Anemone
Species: A. hupehensis
Binomial name
Anemone hupehensis
(Lemoine) Lemoine
Culture
Type Flower
Light Partial shade
Water Moderate to large amount
Soil Acidic soil
Hardiness USDA Zone 4a to 8
Bloom Period White, pink, or purple color, late summer to early fall
Propagation Root cutting[1]

Anemone hupehensis, Anemone hupehensis var. japonica, and Anemone × hybrida (commonly known as the Chinese anemone or Japanese anemone, thimbleweed, or windflower) are species of flowering herbaceous perennials in the Ranunculaceae family.

Anemone × hybrida is a hybrid of Anemone hupehensis var. japonica and Anemone vitifolia.[2]

Description[edit]

Seeds

Height is 3–4 ft (1–1 m). Leaves have three leaflets.

Flowers are 40–60 mm (1.6–2.4 in) across, with 5-6 (or up to 20 in double forms) sculpted pink or white sepals and prominent yellow stamens, blooming from midsummer to autumn.

Cultivation[edit]

These plants thrive best in shady areas and under protection of larger plants, and in all but the hottest and the driest conditions in the United States.[3] They are especially sensitive to drought or overwatering.[4] They can be invasive or weedy in some areas,[5] throwing out suckers from the fibrous rootstock, to rapidly colonise an area. Once established they can be extremely difficult to eradicate.[6] On the other hand, they can take some time to become established.[7]

Cultivars[edit]

The following cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

  • 'Bowles's Pink'[8]
  • 'Hadspen Abundance'[9]
  • 'Honorine Jobert'[10]
  • 'Königin Charlotte' ('Queen Charlotte')[11]
  • 'Pamina'[12]
  • 'September Charm'[13]

History[edit]

A. hupehensis is native to central China, though it has been naturalised in Japan for hundreds of years.

The species was first named and described in Flora Japonica (1784), by Carl Thunberg. Thunberg had collected dried specimens while working as a doctor for the Dutch East Indies Company.[4] In 1844, Robert Fortune brought the plant to England from China, where he found it often planted about graves.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anemone hupehensis/ Anemone japonica". Rob's Plants. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Learn2Grow: Anemone × hybrida 'Pamina'
  3. ^ "Anemones". plantideas.com. Archived from the original on 23 December 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  4. ^ a b Klingaman, Gerald (13 October 2006). "Plant of the Week Japanese anemone Latin: Anemone x hybrida". University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  5. ^ "Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Bressingham Glow' (Japanese anemone)". The Taunton Press. Archived from the original on 3 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  6. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  7. ^ Feather, Judy (5 January 2010). "Japanese Anemone: Fall Color in the Garden". CSU/Denver County Extension Master Gardener. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  8. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis 'Bowles's Pink'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis 'Hadspen Abundance'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'Honorine Jobert'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  11. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'Konigin Charlotte'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Pamina'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  13. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'September Charm'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  14. ^ "Anemone hupehensis 'Kriemhilde'". Paghat the Ratgirl. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 

External links[edit]