Angel (season 2)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Angel (season 2)
Angel DVD Season (2).jpg
Region 1 Season 2 DVD cover
Country of origin United States
No. of episodes 22
Broadcast
Original channel The WB
Original run September 26, 2000 (2000-09-26) – May 22, 2001 (2001-05-22)
Home video release
DVD release
Region 1 September 2, 2003 (2003-09-02)
Region 2 April 15, 2002 (2002-04-15)
Season chronology
← Previous
Season 1
Next →
Season 3
List of Angel episodes

The second season of the television series Angel, the spin-off of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, premiered on September 26, 2000 on The WB and concluded its 22-episode season on May 22, 2001. It maintained its previous timeslot, airing Tuesdays at 9:00 pm ET, following Buffy.

Season synopsis[edit]

The Angel Investigations team, now in their new headquarters at the Hyperion Hotel, are trying to decipher what Wolfram & Hart raised at the end of season one with the Scrolls of Aberjan. It turns out that it was Darla – now human, ailing and mentally unstable – who is being used by Wolfram & Hart to unhinge Angel by mystically invading his dreams. It turns out that Darla has been returned to the human form she had before being turned, which means that she has a soul but is now dying from the same case of syphilis that originally almost killed her. She begs Angel to turn her into a vampire to save her life. He refuses and instead takes part in a dangerous trial to attempt to buy her a second chance. He succeeds. Unfortunately it can't help Darla, her having already been rescued from life once before. However, his sacrifice proves to her that humanity has strength within it after all, and she begins to make peace with the idea of dying. Wolfram & Hart however do not share her view and bring forth Drusilla to sire the uncooperative Darla (their original plan having been that Angel would do so, further darkening his path). With Drusilla and an again-soulless Darla now together and loose on the streets of Los Angeles, Angel decides he has no choice but to sink to their level in order to defeat them. He fires his crew (Cordelia, Wesley and Gunn) and purposefully allows Darla and Drusilla to slaughter the Special Projects division of Wolfram & Hart including Holland Manners. During the massacre the vampires intentionally leave Lindsey McDonald and Lilah Morgan alive to act as their liaisons to Wolfram & Hart. The two lawyers begin competing for the position of head of Special Projects, in fear of losing their jobs as the firm decides to "trim the fat." Meanwhile, Angel trains himself to take on Darla and Drusilla. He finds and destroys the potential demon army they planned to use to destroy Los Angeles, and then violently sets both of them on fire (although not killing them).

As Angel is off on his own, the other three members of the gang start their own detective agency using what little resources they have. In "Reprise", Angel decides to take down Wolfram & Hart at its core (the Senior Partners) and attempts to find a way to the Home Office, which he believes refers to Hell. Meanwhile, Darla has also been looking for the Senior Partners, intending to join in their power. Angel eventually sneaks onto the W&H property and shares an elevator ride with the deceased Holland Manners, who tells him that the Home Office is not some dark, demonic dimension but is simply Earth. "The world doesn't work in spite of evil, Angel. It works for it. It works because of it." In a fit of blind despair, Angel ends up having sex with Darla in hopes that he can lose his soul with its crushing burden of conscience. Afterwards he has an epiphany and realizes his mistake; he also allows Darla to leave town but he claims that he will have to kill her if he sees her again. He seeks out the team and humbly asks if he can work for them rather than being the boss again. They agree to do so, but not without some hesitation and doubt about trusting him again. They move back into the Hyperion Hotel and Wesley is put in charge of the Agency.

As the season progresses Cordelia goes from a superficial, carefree youth to a strong, humble and worthy helper of the helpless; Wesley evolves from the bumbling fool of the previous season into a semi-assertive leader, whilst Gunn is brought down a notch and bonds further with the team. The character of "The Host" (or Lorne, as he comes to be known by the climax of the season) is introduced at the start of the season as a mystical guide who helps people find their way. He can do this by looking into people's souls when they sing karaoke at his nightclub "Caritas". Lindsey becomes tired of his life at Wolfram & Hart and, after getting a new hand, shoots up the office and leaves Los Angeles and his rivalry with Angel behind. Lilah is subsequently put in charge of Special Projects. Meanwhile, detective Kate Lockley falls deeper into a state of loneliness and despair which compromises her skills as a detective, forcing the department to fire her. She subsequently takes an overdose of medication but is saved by Angel, who barges into her apartment and sobers her up. Kate begins to come to terms with the world that surrounds them and finds solace in the idea that somebody is watching out for her, since Angel was able to enter her apartment to save her, despite her never having invited him.

During the last four episodes of the season, Cordelia is accidentally transported to Lorne's home world known as Pylea, and the rest of the team follows. It is a medieval world where the population is ruled by an occult priesthood known as the Covenant, headed by a demon named Silas, and humans are kept as slaves (referred to as "cows"). Lorne discovers that his family still hates him as much as ever. Cordelia, marked as special because of her visions, is made a monarch but is unknowingly just a tool of the priests. Angel (who can both walk in the sun and see his own reflection) saves the life of a slave girl named Fred who had been sucked in through a portal from Los Angeles years earlier. He also has one of his greatest struggles with his demon side, which comes out so completely on this world that it threatens to overwhelm his humanity. Gunn and Wesley, acting somewhat as advisors to Cordelia, learn of a connection between the priests and Wolfram & Hart and decide to flee the castle. They escape but Cordelia cannot. Gunn and Wesley eventually join a group of humans planning to rebel against the Covenant and Wesley is put in charge of the attack, where he begins learning of his true skills as a leader. Silas is eventually cornered, and Cordelia chops his head off before he can use his magical device to slaughter every slave on Pylea. Cordelia then uses her royal power to free the slaves and declare everyone equal. The gang and Fred return home happy, only to find Willow waiting at the hotel to inform them of Buffy's death.

Cast and characters[edit]

Main cast[edit]

Recurring cast[edit]

Crew[edit]

Series creators Joss Whedon and David Greenwalt served as executive producers, while Greenwalt would serve as the series' showrunner as Whedon was running Buffy. Whedon didn't write a script for the season, although he did write the stories to "Judgment" and "Happy Anniversary", directed the fourth episode "Untouched" (the only television episode he's directed that he also didn't write) and even acted in the season's penultimate episode as Lorne's dancing cousin Numfar. Buffy writer/producer Marti Noxon served as consulting producer, with other Buffy writers Jane Espenson, Douglas Petrie and David Fury were asked to write freelance scripts.

Tim Minear (supervising producer, promoted to co-executive producer midseason) and Jim Kouf (consulting producer) were the only writers kept on the staff. Minear ended up writing the most episodes of the season, including important episodes during the Angel/Darla story arc including "Darla", "The Trial", "Reunion", "Reprise" and "Epiphany". "Darla" also counted as Minear's directorial debut. Mere Smith, who was a script coordinator during the first season was promoted to a staff writer, and began writing episodes. Shawn Ryan was hired for the season and also served as a producer.[1]

James A. Contner (also co-producer) directed the highest amount of episodes in the second season, directing three episodes. David Greenwalt directed two, including the season finale.

Episodes[edit]

No. in
series
No. in
season
Title Directed by Written by Original air date Production
code
23 1 "Judgment" Michael Lange Story by: Joss Whedon & David Greenwalt
Teleplay by: David Greenwalt
September 26, 2000 (2000-09-26) 2ADH01
After accidentally killing her protector, Angel champions a pregnant woman being hunted down by demons.
24 2 "Are You Now or Have You Ever Been" David Semel Tim Minear October 3, 2000 (2000-10-03) 2ADH02
In the 1950s, Angel aids a woman living on the lam in the Hyperion Hotel, an establishment with a long history of death and mayhem. In the present, Angel returns to the Hyperion and tracks the demon he refused to stop 50 years earlier.
25 3 "First Impressions" James A. Contner Shawn Ryan October 10, 2000 (2000-10-10) 2ADH03
Angel encounters an amorous Darla in his dreams. Meanwhile, Cordelia vows to protect Gunn.
26 4 "Untouched" Joss Whedon Mere Smith October 17, 2000 (2000-10-17) 2ADH04
Angel attempts to help a girl with telekinetic powers before she falls into the hands of Wolfram and Hart.
27 5 "Dear Boy" David Greenwalt David Greenwalt October 24, 2000 (2000-10-24) 2ADH05
At the behest of Wolfram & Hart, Darla attempts to unbalance Angel enough to force him to embrace his dark side.
28 6 "Guise Will Be Guise" Krishna Rao Jane Espenson November 7, 2000 (2000-11-07) 2ADH06
Angel meets a Swami to end his obsession with Darla. Wesley assumes Angel's identity and plays bodyguard.
29 7 "Darla" Tim Minear Tim Minear November 14, 2000 (2000-11-14) 2ADH07
Angel is desperate to rescue Darla from the clutches of Wolfram & Hart. Darla remembers her past.
30 8 "The Shroud of Rahmon" David Grossman Jim Kouf November 21, 2000 (2000-11-21) 2ADH08
Angel goes undercover with Gunn to prevent a mind-altering Shroud from falling into the wrong hands.
31 9 "The Trial" Bruce Seth Green Story by: David Greenwalt
Teleplay by: Douglas Petrie & Tim Minear
November 28, 2000 (2000-11-28) 2ADH09
Learning that Darla is dying, Angel refuses to turn her into a vampire. Instead, he undertakes a series of mystical ordeals in which he must ultimately sacrifice his own life for hers.
32 10 "Reunion" James A. Contner Tim Minear & Shawn Ryan December 19, 2000 (2000-12-19) 2ADH10
The newly revamped deadly duo of Drusilla and Darla hit the streets of LA. Angel is frantic.
33 11 "Redefinition" Michael Grossman Mere Smith January 16, 2001 (2001-01-16) 2ADH11
After firing his staff and cutting himself off from all help, Angel takes on Darla and Drusilla.
34 12 "Blood Money" R.D. Price Shawn Ryan & Mere Smith January 23, 2001 (2001-01-23) 2ADH12
Angel threatens to reveal W&H's criminality when he discovers they're stealing from a teen shelter.
35 13 "Happy Anniversary" Bill L. Norton Story by: Joss Whedon & David Greenwalt
Teleplay by: David Greenwalt
February 6, 2001 (2001-02-06) 2ADH13
Angel and The Host search for a physicist who plans to freeze time, while Wesley, Cordelia and Gunn establish themselves as independent detectives.
36 14 "The Thin Dead Line" Scott McGinnis Jim Kouf & Shawn Ryan February 13, 2001 (2001-02-13) 2ADH14
Angel teams up with Kate to investigate the rumours of zombie policemen who are out for blood while Cordelia, Wesley, and Gunn fend for themselves.
37 15 "Reprise" James Whitmore, Jr. Tim Minear February 20, 2001 (2001-02-20) 2ADH15
One of Wolfram and Hart's "senior partners" is coming to visit, and Angel is determined to take it out.
38 16 "Epiphany" Thomas J. Wright Tim Minear February 27, 2001 (2001-02-27) 2ADH16
After an empty night of passion with Darla, Angel wakes up with his soul still intact and has an epiphany.
39 17 "Disharmony" Fred Keller David Fury April 17, 2001 (2001-04-17) 2ADH17
While the group tries to track down vampires, Cordelia gets a surprise visit from her high school friend Harmony.
40 18 "Dead End" James A. Contner David Greenwalt April 24, 2001 (2001-04-24) 2ADH18
Cordelia's visions get worse and the gang fears for her health. Meanwhile, Lindsey is granted a new hand.
41 19 "Belonging" Turi Meyer Shawn Ryan May 1, 2001 (2001-05-01) 2ADH19
Angel and his crew must find a way to kill a bloodthirsty demon who has arrived in town from another dimension.
42 20 "Over the Rainbow" Fred Keller Mere Smith May 8, 2001 (2001-05-08) 2ADH20
Cordelia is sucked through a magic portal and transported to a demon dimension where humans are considered inferior, prompting the gang to rescue her.
43 21 "Through the Looking Glass" Tim Minear Tim Minear May 15, 2001 (2001-05-15) 2ADH21
After learning that Cordelia has become the Princess of Pylea, Wesley and Gunn are captured by rebels as Angel tries to save a slave sentenced to execution.
44 22 "There's No Place Like Plrtz Glrb" David Greenwalt David Greenwalt May 22, 2001 (2001-05-22) 2ADH22
Aided by Fred, Angel struggles with his inner beast the demon dimension brings out in him, while Wesley and Gunn join with rebel forces to overthrow the government. In the last scene, the team return home to the Hyperion to find Willow with news of Buffy's death in "The Gift".

Crossovers with Buffy the Vampire Slayer[edit]

The second season of Angel aired along with the fifth season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Both shows retained their timeslots on The WB Television Network, airing on Tuesdays at 9:00 PM ET and 8:00 PM ET respectively.

The Buffy episode "Fool for Love" is a companion to the Angel episode "Darla". Both episodes feature multiple flashbacks to the history of Spike (James Marsters) and Darla (Julie Benz), shown from their respective viewpoints. Angel (David Boreanaz) and Drusilla (Juliet Landau) also appear in both episodes. Both episodes feature the same scene – one from the point of view of Spike and the other from Angel, Darla, and Drusilla.

Buffy recurring character Drusilla makes her first present appearance on Angel in the episode "The Trial". She returns to Sunnydale in her final present-tense appearance in the episode "Crush".

Angel visits Buffy in the episode "Forever" to comfort her after he learns her mother died.

Buffy recurring character Harmony Kendall (Mercedes McNab) visits L.A. in the episode "Disharmony". Harmony would later appear in the fifth season of Angel and become a main character. Willow (Alyson Hannigan) also appears in the episode in a conversation with Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter) over the phone.

Willow comes to L.A. in the season two finale, "There's No Place Like Plrtz Glrb" to deliver the news to Angel that Buffy had died.

Reception[edit]

The second season won the the International Horror Guild Award for Best Television. It was nominated for five Saturn Awards – Best Network Television Series, Best Actor on Television (David Boreanaz), Best Actress on Television (Charisma Carpenter), Best Supporting Actor on Television (Alexis Denisof) and Best Supporting Actress on Television (Juliet Landau).[2]

The Futon Critic named "Reunion" the 20th best episode of 2000.[3]

The second season averaged 4.1 million viewers, slightly lower than the fifth season of Buffy.[4]

DVD release[edit]

Angel: The Complete Second Season was released on DVD in region 1 on September 2, 2003[5] and in region 2 on April 15, 2002.[6] The DVD includes all 22 episodes on 6 discs presented in anamorphic widescreen 1.78:1 aspect ratio. Special features on the DVD include two commentary tracks—"Are You Now or Have You Ever Been" by writer Tim Minear and "Over the Rainbow" by director Fred Keller. Scripts for "Darla" and "Disharmony" are included. Featurettes include, "Making up the Monsters", which details the make-up design; "Inside the Agency" is a set tour of various sets; "Stunts" details the choreography of the stunts; and "Season 2 Overview" is a summary of the season featuring interviews with cast and crew members. A photo stills gallery is also included.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Brief History of Mutant Enemy". Whedon.info. May 24, 2004. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  2. ^ ""Angel" (1999) - Awards". IMDb. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ Brian Ford Sullivan (January 4, 2001). "The 20 Best Episodes of 2000". The Futon Critic. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  4. ^ "The Bitter End". Entertainment Weekly. June 1, 2001. Retrieved August 10, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Angel - Season One (1999)". Amazon.com. Retrieved August 9, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Buffy DVD and VHS". BBC. Retrieved August 9, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Angel - The Complete 2nd Season". TVShowsOnDVD.com. Retrieved February 18, 2011. 

External links[edit]