Angela D'Amore

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Angela D'Amore
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Drummoyne
In office
22 March 2003 – 26 March 2011
Preceded by John Murray
Succeeded by John Sidoti
Parliamentary Secretary Assisting the Minister for Police and Assisting the Minister for Climate Change and the Environment
Personal details
Born (1971-10-10) 10 October 1971 (age 42)
New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Labor Party (2003–2011)
Alma mater University of Sydney
Website NSW Legislative Assembly webpage

Angela D'Amore (born 10 October 1971), a former Australian politician, was a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, representing the electorate of Drummoyne from 2003 until 2011.


Background and early years[edit]

D’Amore is the daughter of immigrants, who migrated from Italy in 1964. She was educated at Bethlehem College, Ashfield and the University of Sydney and was an officer for the Municipal Employees Union and the NSW Nurses’ Association.[1]

New South Wales state politics[edit]

D'Amore was elected at the 2003 NSW general election.[2] In March 2010, D'Amore was appointed Parliamentary Secretary Assisting the Minister for Police and Parliamentary Secretary Assisting the Minister for Climate Change and Environment in the Kristina Keneally Labor government.

D'Amore's previous parliamentary experience includes:[3]

  • Chair of the Committee on the Office of the Ombudsman and Police Integrity Commission. 2007 - 2008
  • Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Women’s Representative for Australia
  • Deputy Chair of Committee of the International Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Women’s Steering

D'Amore proposed major infrastructure changes in the area, such as the M4 east and Iron Cove Bridge widening.[citation needed]. It was claimed that the widening would complement D'Amore's announcement of securing 400 new bus services in March 2010. The M4 East extension is aimed at channelling traffic underground, easing pressure on surface roads, to get Sydney buses running on time effectively and efficiently. D'Amore has noted that the tunnel would be a major public transport outcome for the Inner West.[4]

Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) investigation[edit]

On 22 September 2010, it was revealed that D'Amore was under investigation by ICAC relating to the implementation of a 2006 draft guideline. The matter was in relation to whether relief officers worked in parliament house or at the Drummoyne electorate office over a number of days. Ms D'Amore denied any wrongdoing and stated that she did not gain any personal or financial benefit. The relief officers had worked the correct days, on the correct rate of pay and undertook the correct duties but had undertaken their electorate duties in Parliament house rather than the Drummoyne electorate office. [5] During the hearing, Ms D'Amore denied knowing the claim forms were incorrect when she signed them.[6][7] Further, the NSW Parliament Employee Services Manager stated during the investigation, the relief officers forms had been amended and approved by Parliament as they were in the 'spirit of the draft guideline'. Subsequently, Ms D'Amore was not made aware by Parliament that relief officers had not completed forms correctly. Despite this on 7 December 2010, ICAC made adverse findings against D'Amore and was of the opinion that the advice of the NSW Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) should be sought in relation to prosecuting D'Amore for two offences of misconduct in public office.

Ms D'Amore stated she was appalled at the findings and parliamentary colleagues openingly stated that she had been unfairly targeted by ICAC.

She remained a Labor member until the NSW state election in 2011.

Subsequently, the DPP in late 2013, advised the ICAC that there was insufficient evidence to support a criminal prosecution of Ms D'Amore based on ICAC's adverse findings. The DPP's advice was accepted by the ICAC. |url=http://www.icac.nsw.gov.au/investigations/past-investigations/%7Cdate= November 2013

References[edit]

  1. ^ "D'Amore, Angela". Australian Women. Archived from the original on 13 February 2007. Retrieved 15 February 2007. 
  2. ^ "Ms Angela D'Amore, MP". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 8 October 2010. Retrieved 22 September 2010. 
  3. ^ "Angela D'Amore". Angela D'Amore. Retrieved 22 September 2010. 
  4. ^ "MP hails new bus timetable". Inner West Courier. 2 March 2010. Archived from the original on 28 September 2010. Retrieved 22 September 2010. 
  5. ^ "Another Labor MP to face ICAC allowance probe". ABC News (Australia). 22 September 2010. Retrieved 22 September 2010. 
  6. ^ Sharah, Jehane (9 October 2010). "ICAC grills second NSW Labor MP on payroll 'rorts'". The Australian. Retrieved 14 October 2010. 
  7. ^ Brown, Malcolm (8 October 2010). "I didn't think claims were false, D'Amore tells ICAC". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 11 October 2010. Retrieved 14 October 2010. 
Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
John Murray
Member for Drummoyne
2003 – 2011
Succeeded by
John Sidoti