Angels from the Realms of Glory

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Tune for Angels from the Realms of Glory

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"Angels from the Realms of Glory" is a Christmas carol written by Scottish poet James Montgomery.[1] It was first printed in the Sheffield Iris on Christmas Eve 1816, though it only began to be sung in churches after its 1825 reprinting in the Montgomery collection The Christian Psalmist and in the Religious Tract Society's The Christmas Box or New Year's Gift.[1]

Before 1928, the hymn was sung to a variety of tunes, including "Regent Square", "Lewes" by John Randall, and "Wildersmouth" or "Feniton Court" by Edward Hopkins.[1] In the United States, the hymn is today most commonly sung to the tune of "Regent Square" by Henry Smart.[1] In the United Kingdom, however, the hymn came to be sung to the French carol tune "Iris"[2] (Les anges dans nos campagnes, the tune used for "Angels We Have Heard on High") after this setting was published in the Oxford Book of Carols.[1] Sometimes the "Gloria in excelsis Deo" refrain is sung in place of Montgomery's original lyric: "Come and worship Christ the new-born King". On A Christmas Cornucopia, Annie Lennox sings this song but substitutes "Gloria in excelsis Deo" for the "Come and worship Christ the new-born King" refrain. Paul Poulton recorded a rock version of this song on his Grooves 4 Scrooge album.

Lyrics[edit]

Angels, from the realms of glory,

Wing your flight o'er all the earth;
Ye who sang creation's story,
Now proclaim Messiah's birth:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.

Shepherds, in the fields abiding,
Watching o'er your flocks by night,
God with man is now residing,
Yonder shines the infant light:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.

Sages, leave your contemplations,
Brighter visions beam afar;
Seek the great Desire of nations,
Ye have seen his natal star:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.

Sinners, wrung with true repentance,
Doomed for guilt to endless pains,
Justice now revokes the sentence,
Mercy calls you—break your chains:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.

Though an infant now we view him,
He shall fill his Father's throne,
Gather all the nations to him;
Every knee shall then bow down:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.

All creation, join in praising
God the Father, Spirit, Son,
Evermore your voices raising,
To th'eternal Three in One:

Come and worship, come and worship
Worship Christ, the newborn King.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Bradley, Ian. The Penguin Book of Carols. Penguin (1999), p27–29. ISBN 0-14-027526-6.
  2. ^ Angels from the Realms of Glory
  3. ^ Worship II: A Hymnal for Roman Catholic Parishes. Chicago, IL: G.I.A. Publications, Inc. 1975. p. 23.