Angiopteris evecta

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Giant Fern
Angiopteris evecta Coffs Harbour.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pteridophyta
Class: Marattiopsida
Order: Marattiales
Family: Marattiaceae
Genus: Angiopteris
Species: A. evecta
Binomial name
Angiopteris evecta
(G.Forst.) Hoffm.
Synonyms

Angiopteris evecta, commonly known as the Giant Fern, is a rare plant occurring in eastern and northern Australia. Also found growing in nearby islands such as New Guinea and various places in Polynesia and Melanesia.[1] Listed as endangered in New South Wales, where it has been recorded growing in sub tropical rainforest, in the valley of the Tweed River.[2] It is an invasive species in Jamaica.

Angiopteris evecta is the type species of the genus Angiopteris. It was originally described as Polypodium evectum by Georg Forster in 1786,[3] before being reclassified and given its current binomial name in 1796 by Georg Franz Hoffmann.[4] The species name is the Latin adjective evectus "swollen" or "inflated".[5] Common names include giant fern, king fern, oriental vessel fern, and mule's foot fern.

The huge mature fronds measure up to 8 metres (25 ft) long. They originate from a large thick rootstock, up to 150 cm (60 in) high.

Angiopteris evecta can be grown in well-drained moist sites in the garden with some shade. It is unable to be propagated by spores but the lobes from the frond base can be removed and will form a new plant in around a year in a medium of sand and peat.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Angiopteris evecta". Global Invasive Species. 
  2. ^ "Angiopteris evecta". PlantNET - NSW Flora Online. Retrieved 2010-07-12. 
  3. ^ "Polypodium evectum G.Forst.". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. 
  4. ^ "Angiopteris evecta (G.Forst.) Hoffm.". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. 
  5. ^ a b Elliot, Rodger W.; Jones, David L.; Blake, Trevor (1985). Encyclopaedia of Australian Plants Suitable for Cultivation: Vol. 2. Port Melbourne: Lothian Press. p. 195. ISBN 0-85091-143-5.