Anglo-Prussian Convention

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The Anglo-Prussian Convention was agreed on 11 April 1758 between Great Britain and the Kingdom of Prussia formalising the alliance between them that had effectively existed since the Convention of Westminster in 1756.

The two states agreed not to negotiate a separate peace. Britain promised to pay the Prussians a subsidy of £670,000 a year, larger than any wartime subsidies Britain had previous given to an ally.[1] In exchange Britain hoped the Prussian would supply infantry and cavalry to the German Army of Observation commanded by Ferdinand of Brunswick to defend Hanover and neighbouring territories.

It was also agreed that the British would provide a garrison for the port of Emden, recently re-captured from French and Austrian forces by the Allies. This was a significant development as Britain had previously refused to deploy troops on the Continent, and the Secretary of State, William Pitt had dismissed the prospect just months before.

The Alliance between the two states lasted until 1762, when it dissolved in acrimony.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Szabo p.99

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dull, Jonathan R. The French Navy and the Seven Years' War. University of Nebraska Press, 2005.
  • Szabo, Franz A.J. The Seven Years' War in Europe, 1756-1763. Pearson, 2008.