Anicet-Georges Dologuélé

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Anicet-Georges Dologuélé
Prime Minister of the Central African Republic
In office
4 January 1999 – 1 April 2001
President Ange-Félix Patassé
Preceded by Michel Gbezera-Bria
Succeeded by Martin Ziguélé
Personal details
Born 1957 (age 56–57)

Anicet-Georges Dologuélé (born 1957) was Prime Minister of the Central African Republic from 4 January 1999 to 1 April 2001. Subsequently he was President of the Development Bank of Central African States (BDEAC) from 2001 to 2010.

Life and career[edit]

Prior to becoming Prime Minister, Dologuélé served as Minister of Finance and the Budget in the government of Prime Minister Michel Gbezera-Bria.[1] Dologuélé was not a member of the ruling Movement for the Liberation of the Central African People (MLPC) and he faced hostility from the MPLC; on 1 April 2001, he was dismissed by President Ange-Félix Patassé and replaced by Martin Ziguélé. Dologuélé criticized this decision as putting political considerations ahead of "good management".[2]

Dologuélé was appointed to head the BDEAC in August 2001.[3] He remained in that post for over eight years; he was eventually replaced by Mickaël Adandé from Gabon in January 2010.[4]

In October 2013, Dologuélé founded a political party, the Central African Union for Renewal (URCA). He also planned to stand as a candidate in the next presidential election.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Le gouvernement de Centrafrique du 18 février 1997", Afrique Express (French).
  2. ^ "Que va faire Dologuélé ?", Jeune Afrique, 10 April 2001 (French).
  3. ^ "Anicet-Georges Dologuélé", Les Echos, number 18,473, 24 August 2001, page 42 (French).
  4. ^ Jean-Michel Meyer, "BDEAC : Anicet-Georges Dologuéle, victime collatérale", Jeune Afrique, 1 February 2010 (French).
  5. ^ "RCA : naissance d'un nouveau parti de l'opposition", Radio France Internationale, 26 October 2013 (French).
Preceded by
Michel Gbezera-Bria
Prime Minister of the Central African Republic
1999–2001
Succeeded by
Martin Ziguélé